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Educator Preparation and Doctoral Course Descriptors

Please note that the School of Education cannot guarantee that every course listed below will be offered during the 2016-17 academic year. For the most up-to-date listing of the School of Education's course offerings, including details of course pre-requisites and enrollment restrictions, please visit https://isis.jhu.edu/classes/.

ED.610.610 Foundation to Innovation: Adult Learning
Participants will study the history, philosophy, and theory of adult learning, as well as the breadth of the field as they construct their personal philosophies of adult learning for their portfolios. Participants analyze the contributions of major contributors to the field from Knowles to Brookfield. Participants explore the evolution of adult learning theory including traditional and emerging views of the practice of adult learning, such as andragogy, self-directed learning, transformative learning, social and cognitive constructivism, and critical reflection. Participants will investigate the importance of the contextual elements of epistemology and cultural issues, such as class, gender, and race. They will analyze key contributions to the field of adult development and to the field of adult learning. Students will develop their own educational philosophy document. (3 credits)

ED.610.620 Assessment-Based Instructional Design for Adult Learners
Through this course, students develop an approach to instructional design based on the establishment of clearly defined learning goals and indicators of their achievement. Participants design learning-focused, evidence-based instructional experiences for adult learners.  Participants differentiate between knowledge and understanding; coverage and uncoverage; choose between depth and breadth; and create appropriate and authentic assessment tasks, including classroom assessments to demonstrate learning. Participants also develop valid, reliable, summative, and formative assessments. (3 credits)

ED.610.630 Effective Instructional Strategies and Technologies for Adult Learning
Participants learn how to select and use appropriate techniques and strategies, including technology, to create learning experiences aligned with learning goals and their corresponding assessment. Participants experiment with and examine effective elements of interactive lectures, small groups, and case studies. Participants give special attention to the role of technology in enhancing the teaching-learning process. Specifically, participants analyze the impact of various techniques and technologies in order to choose the most effective means to accomplish learning goals. (3 credits)

ED.610.640 Leadership in Adult Learning
Participants study leadership qualities such as responsiveness, accountability, and scholarship that are critical for effective needs assessment, program design, advocacy, implementation, and evaluation of adult learning experiences. They examine the unique needs of leaders within the diverse adult learning settings of higher education, business, and community. Participants explore teaching as scholarship, study models such as action learning, and explore potential funding sources. Next, they center on the development of needs assessments, measuring results, and advocating for internal and external support and resources to address a community, professional, legislative, or business need. Throughout this process, participants adjust their language and approach to match the varied cultures associated with business, higher education, professions, government, and specialized communities. Participants develop an outcomes based project targeted to address an identified need in one of these settings. (3 credits)

ED.610.650 Internship in Adult Learning
Participants engage in a capstone project to apply and analyze their approach to adult learning. Under the guidance of a faculty sponsor, each participant prepares an extensive learning experience designed to address identified learning goals. Participants implement the learning experience and conduct an analysis of the outcomes with recommendations for future modifications to the experience. Participants share learning with a panel of experts. (3 credits)

ED.810.602 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in School Settings
Students consider the philosophical, historical, and psychological foundations for elementary and secondary school curriculum and explore the linkages between assessment-based curriculum and instructional strategies. After examining the scope and sequence of the K-12 curriculum, students evaluate options presented in various school reform plans and contemporary research findings in effective schools and effective instruction.  Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.603 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School: Part I
This course is designed for candidates in the elementary education certification program. Students explore strategies for teaching mathematics, language arts, and the aesthetic areas of music, art, and physical education in the elementary school. Activities, materials, and technology address the varying developmental and learning needs of elementary school children and examine ways of integrating aspects of the curriculum. Participants engage in lesson planning and micro-teaching activities for teaching problem solving and higher order thinking skills. This course includes uses of the Internet to obtain curricular resources. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.604 Methods of Teaching in the Elementary School: Part II
This course is designed for candidates in the elementary education certification program. Students explore strategies for teaching science, social studies, and health with an integration of language arts, and the aesthetics areas of music, art, and physical education in the elementary school. Activities, materials, and technology address the varying developmental and learning needs of elementary school children and examine ways of integrating aspects of the curriculum. Participants engage in lesson planning and microteaching activities for teaching problem solving and higher order thinking skills. This course includes uses of the Internet to obtain curricular resources. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.606 Human Development and Learning
This course integrates key insights into current theory and practice in human growth and development and educational psychology (learning). Participants analyze a variety of learner characteristics that influence student development and academic achievement. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.607 Culturally Responsive Teaching
Candidates will explore the social, organizational, and structural factors influencing educational opportunities, experiences, and outcomes of culturally diverse students. Through personal reflection and analysis, candidates will determine the best way for them to positively impact students, regardless of ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, etc. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (2-3 credits)

ED.810.611 Methods of Teaching in Secondary English
Participants explore a variety of instructional techniques, focusing on best practices drawn from research and expert practitioners, reflective teaching, and inductive approaches to instruction. Specific applications to secondary education in English are provided. Through laboratory sessions, students apply the course content to their English classroom, examine appropriate teaching materials, and engage in micro-teaching sessions. Methods for teaching literacy at the secondary level are integrated into course assignments. This course includes use of the Internet to obtain curriculum resources. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (6 credits; may be taken over two semesters)

ED.810.612 Methods of Teaching in Secondary Math
Participants explore a variety of instructional techniques, focusing on best practices drawn from research and expert practitioners, reflective teaching, and inductive approaches to instruction. Specific applications to secondary education in math are provided. Through laboratory sessions and the use of technology, students apply the course content to their math classroom, examine appropriate teaching materials, and engage in micro-teaching sessions. Methods for teaching literacy at the secondary level are integrated into course assignments. This course includes use of the Internet to obtain curriculum resources. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (6 credits; may be taken over two semesters)

ED.810.613 Methods of Teaching in Secondary Science
Participants explore a variety of instructional techniques, focusing on best practices drawn from research and expert practitioners, reflective teaching, and inductive approaches to instruction. Specific applications to secondary education in science are provided. Through laboratory sessions, students apply the course content to their science classroom, examine appropriate teaching materials, and engage in micro-teaching sessions. Methods for teaching literacy at the secondary level are integrated into course assignments. This course includes use of the Internet to obtain curriculum resources. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (6 credits; may be taken over two semesters)

ED.810.614 Methods of Teaching in Secondary Social Studies
Participants explore a variety of instructional techniques, focusing on best practices drawn from research and expert practitioners, reflective teaching, and inductive approaches to instruction. Specific applications to secondary education in social studies are provided. Through laboratory sessions, students apply the course content to their social studies classroom, examine appropriate teaching materials, and engage in micro-teaching sessions. Methods for teaching literacy at the secondary level are integrated into course assignments. This course includes use of the Internet to obtain curriculum resources.  Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (6 credits; may be taken over two semesters)

ED.810.618 Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
This course is designed for candidates in the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) certification program. Candidates explore strategies, materials, and technology that will assist them in teaching English to Limited English Proficiency students and in supporting the learning of pre K-12 students in the academic content subjects. Participants engage in lesson planning, review materials for appropriateness, and take part in micro-teaching activities and reflection.  This course involves the use of the Internet to obtain curricular resources. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (6 credits; may be taken over two semesters)

ED.810.621 Special Topics in Secondary English
The purpose of this course is to improve prospective teachers’ content knowledge in English. Students explore specific topics in English through seminar discussions, research, projects, and classroom application assignments. Topics are content-focused and vary each semester with the needs of the students. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.622 Special Topics in Mathematics
The purpose of this course is to improve prospective teachers’ content knowledge in mathematics. Students explore specific topics in math through seminar discussions, research, projects, and classroom application assignments. Topics are content-focused and vary each semester with the needs of the students. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.623 Special Topics in Science
The purpose of this course is to improve prospective teachers’ content knowledge in science. Students explore specific topics in science through seminar discussions, research, projects, and classroom application assignments. Topics are content-focused and vary each semester with the needs of the students. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.624 Special Topics in Secondary Social Studies
The purpose of this course is to improve prospective teachers’ content knowledge in social studies. Students explore specific topics in social studies through seminar discussions, research, projects, and classroom application assignments. Topics are content-focused and vary each semester with the needs of the students. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.628 English Grammar and Second Language Acquisition for ESOL Teachers
This course provides prospective and current ESOL teachers with a background in current issues in second language acquisition and knowledge about the structure of the English language. Specifically, the course is designed to improve the teacher’s own understanding of English grammatical structure, with a secondary focus of how English structure can be taught to ESOL students within the context of factors that influence second language acquisition. Course content is aligned with the Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.629 Supporting English Language Learners in Literacy and Content Knowledge Development
English Language Learners (ELLs) face particular challenges in school because they are simultaneously learning a language (English) and attending subject matter classes, such as social studies, mathematics, science etc., that are being taught in English.  Often ESL teachers are called upon to help ELLs make sense of their subject matter classes, in addition to helping them acquire English.  This course helps teachers acquire strategies to facilitate ELLs’ ability to attain the content knowledge required of them to be successful in school, while at the same time improving their reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills in the English language. Course content is aligned with the Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (3 credits)

ED.810.639 Personalizing Learning and Instruction in the Classroom
Personalized learning is being used to describe and direct the future of education. This course defines personalized learning and its successful application into schools, differentiating among educational approaches designed to maximize student achievement. Participants will observe, plan, and reflect on units of instruction following the vision of personalized learning. Educators, administrators, and pre-service teachers will gain the skills and habits to implement elements of personalized learning. Committing to flexible learning, understanding students as individual learners, and collecting and applying data, participants will explore existing supports and resources to implement units of instruction and hold active and meaningful roles within classrooms, schools, and research institutions. Some visits to schools or programs may occur outside of class time. (3 credits)

ED.810.640 Supervised Internship and Seminar in the Elementary Schools
Students spend a minimum of a semester in appropriate elementary school settings under the guidance and direct supervision of a certified teacher and/or a university supervisor, depending upon the program format. A support seminar meets to enable students to discuss and reflect upon their experiences.  Emphasis is placed on applying concepts, techniques, and theories learned in courses and other structured learning experiences to classroom settings. Supervisors provide guidance in the application of rigorous content in developmentally appropriate ways. Participants reflect, continue to develop their portfolios, and prepare for portfolio presentations. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (6 credits)
Note: Open only to students admitted to the Master of Arts in Teaching program. As this is a 100-day internship, candidates are required to continue at the site beyond the standard one semester timeframe.

ED.810.641 MAT Clinical Practice for Elementary Candidates: Part I
This school-based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to work with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites (PDS and Partnership Schools) serve as clinical laboratories where students begin a minimum 100-day internship where they can observe how pupils learn, discover appropriate teaching strategies, plan lessons, implement teaching methods, as well as develop classroom management skills. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core and CAEP requirements. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty. Candidates must complete this experience with a B or better in order to advance to the Clinical Practice II course. (2 credits)
Note: Open only to students admitted to the Montgomery County Partnership or full-time MAT program options.

ED.810.642 MAT Clinical Practice for Elementary Candidates: Part II
This school-based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to continue working with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites (PDS and Partnership Schools) serve as clinical laboratories where students complete their minimum 100-day internship observing how pupils learn, practicing appropriate teaching strategies, planning lessons, implementing teaching methods, as well as refining classroom management skills. Students will complete their professional portfolio with evidence acquired in this course. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core and CAEP requirements. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty. Candidates must complete this experience with a B or better in order to be recommended for graduation and state certification. (3 credits)
Note: Open only to students admitted to the Montgomery County Partnership or full-time MAT program options.

ED.810.645 Supervised Internship and Seminar in the Secondary Schools
Students spend a minimum of one semester in appropriate secondary school settings under the guidance and direct supervision of a certified teacher and/or a university supervisor, depending upon the program format. A support seminar meets to enable students to discuss and reflect upon their experiences.  Emphasis is placed on applying concepts, techniques, and theories learned in courses and other structured learning experiences to secondary classroom settings. Supervisors provide guidance in the application of rigorous content in developmentally appropriate ways. Participants reflect, continue to develop their portfolios, and prepare for portfolio presentations. Course content is aligned with the Maryland Common Core Curriculum employed by partnership schools. (6 credits)
Note: Open only to students admitted to the Master of Arts in Teaching program. As this is a 100-day internship, candidates are required to continue at the site beyond the standard one semester timeframe.

ED.810.646 MAT Clinical Practice for Secondary Candidates: Part I
This school-based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to work with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites (PDS and Partnership Schools) serve as clinical laboratories where students begin a minimum 100-day internship where they can observe how pupils learn, discover appropriate teaching strategies, plan lessons, implement teaching methods, as well as develop classroom management skills. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core and CAEP requirements. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty. Candidates must complete this experience with a B or better in order to advance to the Clinical Practice II course. (2 credits)
Note: Open only to students admitted to the Montgomery County Partnership or full-time MAT program options.

ED.810.647 MAT Clinical Practice for Secondary Candidates: Part II
This school-based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to continue working with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites (PDS and Partnership Schools) serve as clinical laboratories where students complete their minimum 100-day internship observing how pupils learn, practicing appropriate teaching strategies, planning lessons, implementing teaching methods, as well as refining classroom management skills. Students will complete their professional portfolio with evidence acquired in this course. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core and CAEP requirements. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty. Candidates must complete this experience with a B or better in order to be recommended for graduation and state certification. (3 credits)
Note: Open only to students admitted to the Montgomery County Partnership or full-time MAT program options.

ED.810.653 MAT Field Experience
This school or community based experience is designed to provide MAT candidates with an opportunity to observe and work with public and private school students in diverse settings. Hosting sites serve as clinical laboratories where students can observe how pupils learn, discover appropriate teaching strategies, implement teaching methods, as well as begin to develop classroom management skills. This course is aligned with the expectations of the Maryland Common Core and CAEP requirements. This course provides an opportunity to practice clinically while being guided by an experienced master teacher and university faculty. Candidates must complete this experience with a B or better in order to advance to the Clinical Practice I course. (1 credit)

ED.810.655 Teacher Candidate as Action Researcher Through the Use of Technology
Students employ technology to conduct research by planning and engaging in the delivery of a contextually specific instructional intervention, informed by the relevant professional knowledge base (research and best practices), and designed to have a positive impact on the academic success of targeted learners. Students’ experiences in this course help prepare them to be analytical, reflective teachers with the skills to use evidence to inform instructional decisions. Students will explore strategies for integrating technology into their instruction. (2-3 credits)  

ED.810.660 Teacher as Thinker and Writer
Novice teachers will reflect upon and write about their teaching experiences as a means of improving their teaching practice. They will employ a variety of writing forms to reflect on their different roles and contexts required of them in their classrooms, schools, and communities. Each class session will serve as a writing workshop with collaborative activities designed to generate pieces of writing (expository, narrative, descriptive, imaginative, and dramatic). (3 credits)

ED.810.665 School Reform in the Urban Environment
This course examines systemic school reform movements in the urban school context.  School reform occurs at many different levels, from the classroom level with individual teachers, to the national level with federal mandates. We will explore reform at different levels and analyze the theory, policies, practices, and controversies of various mechanisms of reform, including the K-8 movement, small high schools, school choice (charters and vouchers), mayoral control, merit-pay, and alternative routes to teaching. Participants will synthesize information about school reform in urban schools and systems and will reflect on their role in this process. Final evaluation of reform strategies will be grounded in the effect these reforms are having on improving learning for all students in urban schools. (1-3 credits)

ED.810.676 The Paperless Classroom
Students will learn how to integrate social and participatory media and Web 2.0 content into their teaching for the purpose of creating and maintaining an authentic and interactive 21st century paperless classroom. Students will gain hands-on familiarity with new media including strategies for using Twitter, Social Bookmarking, Blogs, Google Apps, and other social multimedia for classroom instruction and assessment. (3 credits)

ED.810.679 Classroom Management
Students consider the practical ways of managing the classroom by examining organizational techniques, procedures and routines, and teaching strategies that help foster appropriate student behavior. Class members investigate management styles and discipline models to develop their own framework for effective classroom management. (2-3 credits)

ED.810.680 Number and Operations for K-8 Lead Teachers
This course will include the following topics: Number systems, number sets, infinity and zero, place value, meaning and models for operations, divisibility tests, factors, number theory, fractions, decimals, ratios, percents, rational numbers, and proportional reasoning. This course will model the process standards of problem solving, reasoning and proof, representations, connections, and communication, and will take a content-applications approach to each topic. (3 credits)

ED.810.681 Algebra for K-8 Lead Teachers
This course will include the following topics: Algebraic thinking, patterns, functions and algorithms, proportional reasoning, linear functions and slopes, solving equations, non-linear functions, and algebraic structure. This course will model the process standards of problem solving, reasoning and proof, representations, connections, and communication, and will take a content-applications approach to each topic. (3 credits)

ED.810.682 Geometry for K-8 Lead Teachers
This course will include the following topics: Geometric thinking, triangles and quadrilaterals, polygons, parallel lines and circles, dissections and proof, Pythagorean Theorem, symmetry, similarity, and solids. This course will model the process standards of problem solving, reasoning and proof, representations, connections, and communication, and will take a content-applications approach to each topic. (3 credits)

ED.810.683 Measurement for K-8 Lead Teachers
This course will include the following topics: Measurable properties, measurement fundamentals, metric system, indirect measurement and trigonometry, area, circles and pi, volume, and measurement relationships. This course will model the process standards of problem solving, reasoning and proof, representations, connections, and communication, and will take a content-applications approach to each topic. (3 credits)

ED.810.684 Data Analysis and Probability for K-8 Lead Teachers
This course will include the following topics: Statistics as problem solving, data organization and representation, describing distributions, five-number summary, variation about the mean, designing experiments, bivariate data and analysis, probability, random sampling, and estimation. This course will model the process standards of problem solving, reasoning and proof, representations, connections, and communication, and will take a content-applications approach to each topic. (3 credits)

ED.810.685 Integrated Mathematics and Science Applications for K-8 Lead Teachers
This course will apply mathematical concepts identified in the standards in various science content areas (life science, Earth and space science, chemistry, physics, and environmental science). Basic mathematical concepts and operations such as numbers, rates, lines, angles, time, shapes, dimensions, equations, averages probabilities, ratios, etc. will be used to make connections to science. Additionally, mathematical representations will be used to plot, graph, and analyze scientific data. The course provides opportunities for the teacher-leaders to develop requisite goals, plans, and materials for teacher development workshops in their school to enhance their peers’ understanding and skills in relation to teaching math and science with an integrated approach. The methodology will include problem solving, collaborative learning, multiple criteria and tools for assessment, and case study analysis. (3 credits)

ED.810.686 Life Science for K-8 Lead Teachers
The goal of this course is to provide K-8 teachers with the requisite knowledge and skills to enable the participants to effectively support student learning and achievement in life science. Participating teachers’ content needs will be identified and addressed through ongoing collaborative and reflective learning processes. The following topics will be covered in the course: Living organisms and their interactions; diversity of life; genetics; evolution; flow of matter and energy; and ecology. Participants will engage in hands-on inquiry and field investigations to learn about scientific ideas and develop a positive attitude, appreciation, and interest in biology. Problem-based inquiries will be organized to develop teachers’ curiosity to explore and observe the natural world, and to involve them in formulating questions, designing investigations, conducting observations, employing simple tools and equipment to gather data, constructing plausible explanations to answer questions, and communicating findings to others. Moreover, adequate opportunities will be provided to the participants to learn about the nature of science, the historical development of models in biology, and the underlying connections among the scientific concepts in various content domains. The applications and impact of technology on human life will be an important feature of the course. (3 credits)

ED.810.687 Earth/Space Science for K-8 Lead Teachers
This course aims to provide K-8 teachers a rich and deeper understanding of Earth and space science.  Content related topics are: Chemical and physical interactions of the environment, Earth, and the universe; weathering and erosion; processes and events causing changes in Earth’s surface; interactions of hydrosphere and atmosphere; Earth history; plate tectonics; and astronomy. Participants will engage in hands-on inquiry to learn about concepts related to Earth science and astronomy. Moreover, adequate opportunities will be provided to the participants to learn about the historical development of models in Earth science and astronomy, and underlying connections among the scientific concepts in these content domains. The applications and impact of technology will also be addressed in the context of the concepts covered in this course. (3 credits)

ED.810.688 Chemistry for K-8 Lead Teachers
The goal of this course is to give K-8 teachers a rich understanding of the nature and content of chemistry. Topics will include: Structure, properties, and interactions of matter; physical and chemical properties of materials; chemical models; chemical reactions; matter and energy transformations; conservation of mass; and the history of development of major ideas in chemistry. Problem-based inquiries will be organized to develop teachers’ curiosity to explore and observe the natural world, and to involve them in formulating questions, designing investigations, conducting observations, gathering and analyzing data, and developing a richer knowledge base in chemistry. The role and application of technology will also be discussed in relation to chemistry concepts. (3 credits)

ED.810.689 Physics for K-8 Lead Teachers
The goal of this course is to give K-8 teachers a rich understanding of foundational physics concepts and their applications. Topics will include: Mechanics, force and motion, gravity, energy transformations, energy sources, electricity, magnetism, light, sound, and wave interactions. Problem-based inquiries will be organized to engage the participants in planning investigations; gathering and analyzing data; offering plausible explanations; and developing a deeper knowledge base in physics. Furthermore, connections between physical concepts, technological tools, and applications of technology will also be discussed in this course. (3 credits)

ED.810.690 Environmental Science for K-8 Lead Teachers
The goal of this course is to provide K-8 teachers with the requisite knowledge and skills to gain a deeper understanding of the nature and content of environmental science. The following topics will be covered: Natural resources and human needs; interactions of environmental factors; environmental issues; impact of human activities on the natural environment; ecosystems; habitat destruction; air, water, and land pollution; and global warming. The national and state content standards highlight the value of integrating technology with science for developing scientific literacy. Participants will be exposed to scientific innovations and their impact on contemporary society. The applications and impact of technology on human life will be an important feature of this course. (3 credits)

ED.813.601 Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching: Part I
In the Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching, educators will determine what transformational teaching looks like in the unique context of their field experience: classroom, school, and community. Each session will focus on specific topics that educators will evaluate for alignment with their vision of transformational teaching. Finally, they will develop a plan of action to apply within their own context. Topics may include the attributes of exemplary teachers, services of community organizations, and characteristics of today’s learners. (3 credits)

ED.813.602 Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching: Part II
In the Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching, educators will determine what transformational teaching looks like in the unique context of their field experience: classroom, school, and community. Each session will focus on specific topics that educators will evaluate for alignment with their vision of transformational teaching. Finally, they will develop a plan of action to apply within their own context. Topics may include the attributes of exemplary teachers, services of community organizations, and characteristics of today’s learners. (3 credits)

ED.813.603 Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching: Part III
In the Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching, educators will determine what transformational teaching looks like in the unique context of their field experience classroom, school, and community. Each session will focus on specific topics that educators will evaluate for alignment with their vision of transformational teaching. Finally, they will develop a plan of action to apply within their own context. Topics may include the attributes of exemplary teachers, services of community organizations, and characteristics of today’s learners. (2 credits)

ED.813.604 Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching: Part IV
Teach For America corps members are required to attend a Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching course all four semesters while in the corps. This course will meet five Saturdays per semester to develop corps members’ competencies in the Teaching as Leadership (TAL) framework, the TAL impact model, and our developing understanding of transformational teaching. While much of a corps members’ university development is rooted in instructional methods and teacher execution, the Seminar in Transformational Leadership and Teaching course develops teachers’ ability to foster the more enduring qualities of access, advocacy, and habits of mind. Additionally, the students in this class will be observed once per quarter via a video-based online protocol. (2 credits)

ED.813.611 Classroom Management: Part I
In this course, educators will gain a deep understanding of basic classroom management approaches including skills to maintain organized and efficient learning environments through classroom procedures and routines. Further, teachers will study motivation theory and apply the research in their own classrooms. This course focuses on how to drive students to invest in their own academic success and be self-motivated in school and beyond. (3 credits)

ED.813.612 Classroom Management: Part II
In this course, educators learn advanced strategies to help students become self-motivated to drive their own academic growth and future life options. By studying motivation theory, educators develop plans to support the individual learning and behavioral needs of all students, even those who may be disruptive in class. Educators use their own unique classroom experiences to further their professional growth and learning in this course. (3 credits)

ED.813.621 Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I: General Educators
In this course, educators will acquire the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices in teaching and learning.  Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. Educators will select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher. (3 credits)

ED.813.622 Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning II: General Educators
In this course, educators will build upon the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices acquired in Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. With guidance from advisers and coaches, educators select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher. (3 credits)

ED.813.631 Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I: Special Educators
In this course, educators will acquire the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices in teaching and learning. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. Educators will select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher. Special educators will also receive differentiated instruction to address the specific needs of their classrooms. (3 credits)

ED.813.632 Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning II: Special Educators
In this course, educators will build upon the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices acquired in Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. With guidance from advisers and coaches, educators select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher. (3 credits)

ED.813.641 Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I: ESOL Educators
In this course, educators will acquire the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices in teaching and learning. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. Educators will select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher. Further, elements of effective ESOL education will be highlighted. (3 credits)

ED.813.642 Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning II: ESOL Educators
In this course, educators will build upon the knowledge and skills of research-based effective practices acquired in Effective Practices in Teaching and Learning I. Through a combination of coaching and online modules, educators will reflect upon their practice and apply instructional skills to motivate their students to achieve at the highest academic level. With guidance from advisers and coaches, educators select online modules that best address their development as a transformational teacher. (3 credits)

ED.813.661 Assessment for Reading Instruction for Young Children
This course presents foundational concepts of assessment in reading as well as the various types and purposes of emergent and beginning reading assessments. Educators will plan and implement research-based reading assessments and use assessment data to make educational decisions and inform early literacy instruction. Educators will use effective techniques for communicating assessment results to peers, students, and parents. (1 credit)

ED.813.662 Assessment for Reading Instruction
This course presents foundational concepts of assessment in reading as well as the various types and purposes of literacy assessment. Educators will plan and implement research-based reading assessments and use assessment data to make educational decisions and inform literacy instruction. Educators will use effective techniques for communicating assessment results to peers, students, and parents. (1 credit)

ED.813.663 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Part II
This course focuses on research-based approaches to developing content literacy, a critical component for student achievement in the content areas. Students will learn and apply assessment practices, including diagnostic, portfolio, and student self-assessments, which pinpoint students’ content literacy strengths and areas for improvement. Educators also will learn and apply instructional strategies to use before, during and after engaging with content area texts and materials. An emphasis will be on assessing the responsiveness to student’s learning differences (e.g., language, culture, learning styles, multiple intelligences, learning difficulties/disabilities, and giftedness). (1 credit)

ED.813.666 Instruction in Reading for the Young Child
This course presents research-based approaches to developing a comprehensive literacy program for children at varying stages of literacy development. Early childhood educators will incorporate into their daily lessons effective practices to promote language and literacy development, including concepts of print, phonological and phonemic awareness, word recognition (e.g., phonics and spelling), fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing. This course focuses on accelerating literacy development through early intervention strategies. Also emphasized are strategies for involving families and the community in support of the literacy program. (3 credits)

ED.813.667 Instruction in Reading
This course presents research-based approaches to developing a comprehensive literacy program for students at varying stages of literacy development. Educators will incorporate into their daily lessons effective practices to promote language and literacy development, including phonological and phonemic awareness, word recognition (e.g., phonics and spelling), fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing. This course focuses on accelerating literacy development in students with low reading achievement through early identification and intervention strategies. Also emphasized are strategies for involving families and the community in support of the literacy program. (3 credits)

ED.813.668 Materials for Teaching Reading to the Young Child
This course focuses on evaluation and selection of reading materials for a comprehensive early literacy program. Early childhood educators will learn and apply effective practices for selecting, evaluating, and organizing texts and materials, including informational and digital texts and resources, for a variety of purposes of reading. Attention will be given to evaluating quality of literature, addressing diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, leveling systems, intervention and family support, and children’s interests and motivation. (3 credits)

ED.813.669 Materials for Teaching Reading
This course focuses on evaluation and selection of reading materials for a comprehensive literacy program. Educators will learn and apply effective practices for selecting, evaluating, and organizing texts and materials, including informational and digital texts and resources, for a variety of purposes of reading. Attention will be given to evaluating quality of literature, addressing diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, leveling systems, intervention and family support, and student interest and motivation. (3 credits)

ED.813.681 Teaching for Transformation I: Secondary Content
In this course, educators in grades 6-12 will take a three-part journey to advancing their knowledge and skills as secondary instructional leaders. They will: 1) learn and apply effective practices for conducting action research in the classroom to inform teaching and learning; 2) engage in a process for providing students access to opportunities otherwise unavailable to them that will inspire students to become lifelong learners and make productive and fulfilling life choices; and 3) build upon their knowledge and skills in content area teaching and learning to become strategic instructional decision makers, increase their self-efficacy in the classroom, and improve student learning and achievement. Emphasis will be on synthesizing learning, reflective practice, and professional growth. (3 credits)

ED.813.682 Teaching for Transformation I: Elementary Content
In this course, educators in grades PreK-5 will take a three-part journey to advancing their knowledge and skills as elementary instructional leaders. They will: 1) learn and apply effective practices for conducting action research in the classroom to inform teaching and learning; 2) engage in a process for providing students access to opportunities otherwise unavailable to them that will inspire students to become lifelong learners and make productive and fulfilling life choices; and 3) build upon their knowledge and skills in content area teaching and learning to become strategic instructional decision makers, increase their self-efficacy in the classroom, and improve student learning and achievement. Emphasis will be on synthesizing learning, reflective practice, and professional growth. (3 credits)

ED.813.683 Teaching for Transformation II: Secondary Content
In this course, educators in grades 6-12 will take a three-part journey to advancing their knowledge and skills as secondary instructional leaders. They will: 1) learn and apply effective practices for conducting action research in the classroom to inform teaching and learning; 2) engage in a process for providing students access to opportunities otherwise unavailable to them that will inspire students to become lifelong learners and make productive and fulfilling life choices; and 3) build upon their knowledge and skills in content area teaching and learning to become strategic instructional decision makers, increase their self-efficacy in the classroom, and improve student learning and achievement. Emphasis will be on synthesizing learning, reflective practice, and professional growth. (3 credits)

ED.813.684 Teaching for Transformation II: Elementary Content
In this course, educators in grades PreK–5 will take a three-part journey to advancing their knowledge and skills as elementary instructional leaders. They will: 1) learn and apply effective practices for conducting action research in the classroom to inform teaching and learning; 2) engage in a process for providing students access to opportunities otherwise unavailable to them that will inspire students to become lifelong learners and make productive and fulfilling life choices; and 3) build upon their knowledge and skills in content area teaching and learning to become strategic instructional decision makers, increase their self-efficacy in the classroom, and improve student learning and achievement. Emphasis will be on synthesizing learning, reflective practice, and professional growth. (3 credits)

ED.851.512 Politics of Education
Federal involvement in education has grown enormously in recent decades with calls for national standards and increasing reliance on standardized tests. While state legislatures and school boards traditionally provide funding and policy, mayors, parents and advocates of charter schools are seeking to redefine the nature of local control. Education leaders should understand the politics of education; the swiftly changing balance of power; and how education politics is practiced between and within the levels of government and the public. Students will study and analyze current issues and case studies that focus on the politics of education. (3 credits)

ED.851.601 Organization and Administration of Schools
Students examine the role of the school administrator, with emphasis on instructional improvement, pupil development and services, school and community relations, administration of facilities and finance, professional development and services for staff, and organizational relationships and responsibilities.  Participants will explore best practices for fostering student achievement. (3 credits)

ED.851.603 School Law
Participants explore the legal foundations and structure of education and consider contemporary issues based on legislation and court decisions. Students develop techniques of legal research and analyze a topic of interest. (3 credits)

ED.851.609 Administrative and Instructional Uses of Technology
Prospective and practicing school administrators examine the issues, ideas, and programs surrounding the use of technology as a tool for administration and instructional management. Through hands-on experience, participants explore practical uses for software that can be applied to their daily work. (3 credits)

ED.851.616 Issues in K-12 Education Policy
This course provides an introduction to and an overview of several key and rapidly expanding areas of educational policy research, teacher effectiveness, teacher labor markets and teacher policy. The goals of this course are to familiarize students with some of the most current research in these areas, and to encourage and support students to develop skills as critical consumers of empirical work and policy debates in educational policy. (3 credits)

ED.851.630 School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement I
Participants examine the theory, research, and best practices on school, family, and community partnerships. Individuals explore different types of partnerships, challenges to developing school-based partnership programs, and the components of effective partnership programs that enhance student performance and success. Participants design an action plan for partnerships to address school improvement goals. (3 credits)

ED.851.631 School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement II
Building on the knowledge and skills developed in 851.630 (School, Family, and Community Collaboration for School Improvement I), students continue to explore research-based theories and best practices in school, family, and community collaboration. The emphasis of this second course in the sequence is on students revising, implementing, and evaluating a key activity in the action plan for partnerships developed in 851.630. (3 credits)

ED.851.633 Introduction to the Independent School
This course will focus on the unique quality of the independent school. A specific focus will remain on the relationship between the parent and the teacher, reworking curriculum to fit the diverse needs of the student, understanding the importance of pedagogy and history in the independent school, and fostering a love of learning in each child. (3 credits)

ED.851.634 Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment in Independent School Settings
Students consider the philosophical, historical, and psychological foundations for lower and upper school curriculum and explore the linkages between assessment-based curriculum and instructional strategies. After examining the scope and sequence of the lower and upper school curricula, students evaluate options presented in various school reform plans that pertain to independent schools and contemporary research findings on effective schools and effective instruction. (3 credits)

ED.851.635 Educating the Whole Child: Teaching to the Developmental Needs of the Child
This course will provide students with a whole picture of the child they will be, or are, teaching. In depth examination will be on the cognitive, physical, and emotional development of a child from age 4 through 18 years. (3 credits)

ED.851.642 Leadership in Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment for Independent Schools
Students examine curriculum theory, design, and content and their relation to instruction and assessment as applied to independent schools. Topics include: curriculum and the independent school mission statement; K-12 curriculum scope and sequence; leadership of curriculum change; curriculum mapping and its implications; methods of assessment; interdisciplinary curriculum development; culturally responsive curriculum, instruction, and assessment; and differentiation of curriculum and instruction. Participants apply course content by developing a plan for curriculum implementation in their own schools. (3 credits)

ED.851.643 Supervision and Professional Development for Personnel in Independent Schools
Students examine models of instructional supervision, including clinical supervision and various approaches to personalizing supervisory strategies appropriate for independent schools. Emphasis is on development of an annual, school-based professional development plan; alignment of instructional goals with the supervision and evaluation of teachers; delegation of supervisory roles; recruitment, retention, and support of faculty and staff in independent schools; designing teacher incentives, recognition, and award programs; and using the principles of high-quality professional development to enhance teachers’ knowledge and skills. Students apply concepts to practical situations in laboratory sessions. (3 credits)

ED.851.644 Public Relations, Marketing, and Fund-raising for Independent Schools
Students explore the importance of public relations, marketing principles, and fund raising to independent school success. Topics include: maintaining positive community relations; management of admission policies and procedures; operation of public relations and publicity functions; coordination of relations with other independent schools; facilitating relations with educational, governmental, and social service agencies; and fund-raising strategies. Students analyze and critique various strategies through case studies and discussion. (3 credits)

ED.851.645 Governance of Independent Schools
Students learn to facilitate positive working relationships within the board of trustees and build effective partnerships between the board and the school's faculty and staff. Topics include setting, communicating, and evaluating progress toward annual goals; strategic planning with faculty, staff, and board members; establishing structures for boards to accomplish their work; reporting effectively to boards on important issues and concerns; models for evaluating the head of school; models for evaluating board performance and contributions of individual board members; developing trustees as effective school advocates; and managing crises. Students gain an understanding of the pressures exerted from multiple constituencies, finding ways to base decisions on what is good for students, what is good for the institution, and what is consistent with their own values. (3 credits)

ED.851.646 Business Management and Finance for Independent Schools
Students learn to apply business principles and financial processes that are the foundation for successful independent school management. Content includes: oversight of independent school budgets;  understanding of tuition and other revenue sources; knowledge and effective use of endowments, financial aid, and loans; understanding of major expenses; annual budget planning; grasping the legal and ethical implications of financial management; developing salary scales and policies; using principles of strategic, long-range planning; and facilities planning, maintenance, and management. Applications include case studies for identifying and resolving common problems and challenges. (3 credits)

ED.851.648 Team Leadership
This course is designed for school leaders, including administrators, supervisors, and teachers, who want to improve their knowledge and ability to facilitate change in the classroom, school, or district. The course is based on the premise that educational leaders devote considerable time working in group situations. The course is based on research and theory in education and other fields related to individual, group, intergroup, and organizational development. Opportunities are provided for participants to explore and practice various strategies with special emphasis on how these relate to change in educational settings. (3 credits)

ED.851.705 Effective Leadership
Students review the principles and techniques required of principals, assistant principals, and teacher leaders. The course emphasizes diagnosis of the school climate, principles of distributed leadership, motivation of faculty teams, and the dynamics of working in and with groups to accomplish school improvement goals. Emphasis is placed on the leader’s role in creating a collaborative vision/mission for a school and in establishing meaningful working relationships with the larger community. (3 credits)

ED.851.708 Systemic Change Process for School Improvement
Students examine the literature on systemic change in schools, with an emphasis on the roles of the teacher leader. Topics include planning, implementing, and evaluating the change process for school improvement. (3 credits)

ED.851.809 Seminar in Educational Administration and Supervision
Students prepare and present a seminar paper on a problem in educational administration or supervision. The paper includes a comprehensive literature review, an assessment of implications for administrative and supervisory behavior, and an implementation plan for addressing the problem in an educational setting. Students engage in case study analyses, role playing, and assessment exercises. (3 credits)

ED.851.810 Internship in Administration and Supervision
Students participate in a supervised practicum experience in an educational setting. Individual and group sessions of the interns are held.  Students must attend an organizational meeting in the semester prior to the semester in which they wish to intern and obtain approval to register for the internship.   (3 credits)

ED.851.811 Internship in Administration and Supervision: I
Students participate in a supervised practicum experience where they demonstrate the application of knowledge, dispositions, competencies, skills and solutions to day-to-day activities performed by practicing administrators or supervisors. Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 observation and performance hours (cumulatively accrued over the three 1-credit internship courses required for the online School Administration and Supervision certificate) aligned with leadership standards. Experiences are reflective of real and simulated field-based activities in a variety of educational settings. Students must also complete a final internship reflection paper, as well as a comprehensive digital portfolio that includes artifacts that are illustrative of their best work. (1 credit)

ED.851.812 Internship in Administration and Supervision: II
Students participate in a supervised practicum experience where they demonstrate the application of knowledge, dispositions, competencies, skills and solutions to day-to-day activities performed by practicing administrators or supervisors. Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 observation and performance hours (cumulatively accrued over the three 1-credit internship courses required for the online School Administration and Supervision certificate) aligned with leadership standards. Experiences are reflective of real and simulated field-based activities in a variety of educational settings. Students must also complete a final internship reflection paper, as well as a comprehensive digital portfolio that includes artifacts that are illustrative of their best work. (1 credit)

ED.851.813 Internship in Administration and Supervision: III
Students participate in a supervised practicum experience where they demonstrate the application of knowledge, dispositions, competencies, skills and solutions to day-to-day activities performed by practicing administrators or supervisors. Students are required to complete a minimum of 200 observation and performance hours (cumulatively accrued over the three 1-credit internship courses required for the online School Administration and Supervision certificate) aligned with leadership standards. Experiences are reflective of real and simulated field-based activities in a variety of educational settings. Students must also complete a final internship reflection paper, as well as a comprehensive digital portfolio that includes artifacts that are illustrative of their best work. (1 credit)

ED.852.602 Supervision and Professional Development
Students examine models of instructional supervision, including clinical supervision and various approaches to personalizing supervisory strategies. Emphasis is on supervision skills, including the assessment of teacher performance, effective conferring strategies, and working with teachers to construct instructional improvement plans.  Students apply concepts developed to practical situations in laboratory sessions. (3 credits)

ED.855.610 Seminar in Teacher Leadership
Students in the final year present and evaluate their projects and plans for implementing change in their work environments. In addition, participants examine selected topics and current issues in educational leadership. (3 credits)

ED.855.621 Instructional Theory in Online Teaching and Learning
This course will provide an empirical and theoretical foundation for effective online teaching and learning. Participants will explore cutting-edge research, theory, and practice of online instruction and engage in collaborative inquiry to address common assumptions about online and blended learning including cultural competence and ethical issues. Participants will draw upon relevant instructional theories, conceptual frameworks, and effective best practices as criteria for selection, implementation, and integration of online learning environments, and apply these theories and frameworks as they begin to construct a literature review to inform the intervention that addresses underlying causes and factors related to their Problem of Practice project. (3 credits)

ED.855.622 Instructional Design Theories and Models
In this course, participants will examine theory and research in instructional design (ID), evaluate the various ID models, and learn to evaluate and apply effective instructional design to enhance interdisciplinary learning experiences in online and blended educational environments. Instructional design theories and approaches will be discussed and contrasting views and perspectives of instructional design will be presented. A user-centered, iterative approach to design will be examined and applied to online and blended learning environments. Contemporary issues and trends in ID and a systems approach to design will be presented. The basic philosophical premise of the course is that there is not one method for design but rather an approach that considers the content, context, audience, and method of delivery in design. Participants will learn to effectively integrate and apply technology into instruction and will continue constructing a literature review that addresses underlying causes and factors related to their Problem of Practice. (3 credits)

ED.855.623 Instructional Message Design in Online Learning Environments
This course will explore theory and research as it relates to instructional message design and its effectiveness in enhancing student learning outcomes, satisfaction, message readability, and better presentation in traditional and digital media learning environments. Message design is the study of manipulating visual symbols and presentation in order to enhance learning. It presupposes that the effective manipulation of symbols modifies the cognitive, psychomotor, or affective behavior. The concepts of message design are grounded in what Dewey (1900) referred to as “linking science” between learning theory and educational practice (Fleming & Levie, 1993). The course will discuss the application of perception theory, communication theory, and systems theory to design and effectively present digital media. Participants will learn message design principles for promoting learner engagement and motivation. They will explore instructional implications, best practices, and learning activities and objectives that benefit their students in the classroom as well as inform their personal and professional development. Participants will apply these novel perspectives as they complete constructing a literature review to inform the intervention for their Problem of Practice project. (3 credits)

ED.855.624 Trends and Issues in Instructional Design, Message Design, and Online Learning
This course explores trends and issues of current and historical significance to instructional design, message design, and online learning. The course prepares participants to make and defend policy decisions and become conversant with current trends and issues in the field. Readings will include contributions of key scholars, past and present, and topics covered include the history of instructional design, message design, and distance education. Critical issues, current trends and future prospects for the field are addressed as well as, research, theories, and approaches and their impact on present and future applications of instructional design, message design, and distance education. Participants will apply these novel perspectives as they begin to consider findings from their intervention study. (3 credits)

ED.855.640 Building Strategic School, Educational Organization, and Community Partnerships
This course provides opportunities for students to engage in reflective practice as an educational or organizational leader, while building organizational and community partnerships to leverage multiple resources for addressing a specific organizational systems issue. Students are expected to 1) become familiar with pertinent theoretical literature; 2) understand the internal and external organizational environment and the pressures of those institutional relationships; 3) understand the roles and responsibilities of creating and sustaining dynamic partnerships, including acting as an informal project manager and community advisor; and 4) anticipate the challenges of navigating through politics, policy, fundraising, marketing, social networking, and possible media involvement. This course will include creating multiple strategies for communicating with internal and external stakeholders as appropriate to disseminate findings related to their Applied Dissertation topic. (3 credits)

ED.855.641 Strategic Systems Change and Action Planning
Education leaders, public and private, need to understand the structures for managing the school and/or organizational environment. These structures include organizational visioning and action planning, budgeting and finance, and the leadership skills that incorporate instructional design, curriculum integration with standards, and logistics of technology implementation, professional development, and evaluation. This course is designed to introduce knowledge management concepts into an organizational or educational context and to provide an in-depth focus on data-driven decision making in organizational and educational institutions. Participants will develop an understanding of how to create and support change through a systems approach. Students will apply these novel concepts and perspectives to continued construction of the literature review to inform their Problem of Practice. (3 credits)

ED.855.642 Human Capital Development and Organizational Finance
This course promotes knowledge and application of best practices in the development of primary organizational resources – its human capital and financial resources. Students will engage in 1) discovering best practices in the educational and/or organizational theoretical literature; 2) exploring human capital development (HCD) concepts, applications, and solutions through analysis of current case studies from the organizational and educational environments; and 3) actively learning to apply current HCD theories, principles, and practices to the student’s organization by appropriately applying these perspectives as they relate to the student’s Problem of Practice. Students will also learn to identify and manage financial resources including grants, philanthropy, and program and product revenues. Students will identify the strategic challenges within human resources and financial management and the application of appropriate, yet innovative, solutions to these challenges. Students will provide evidence of a deep and comprehensive understanding of how organizations could better invest in a particular aspect of HCD and financial management to achieve greater educational and organizational outcomes related to the Problem of Practice and the leadership required to initiate such an effort. (3 credits)

ED.855.643 Turnaround Leadership in Schools and Educational Organizations
This course will provide participants with a deep knowledge of the educational challenges school and other educational organization leaders face in turnaround situations, as well as what is known about effective instructional, human capital, and change management strategies for turning organizations around. It will combine research from multiple fields with practice examples drawn from existing turnaround schools and organizations. The focus will be on what is needed to design an organization such as a high poverty school for success through effectively implementing high leverage change strategies including distributed leadership, recruitment, training, and evaluation; using data to guide and monitor interventions; and effectively integrating external partners to address critical capacity needs. Attention will also be paid to utilizing these turnaround strategies in educational organizations broadly, depending on the student’s Problem of Practice. This course will offer insights and opportunities to further explore the literature to support proposed solutions and/or interventions to ameliorate the identified Problem of Practice. (3 credits)

ED.855.708 Mind, Brain Science and Learning
Building on Multiple Perspectives on Learning and Teaching, this course will survey theoretical and empirical research in the study of cognitive development focusing on recent and ongoing studies of memory, attention, language, and social/emotional development. Participants will examine research literature from multiple fields in the brain sciences, including cognitive science, experimental psychology, and neuroscience. General topics include an overview of brain structure and function, imaging technology, normal brain development, and how differences in development may affect learning. They will explore recent findings on topics such as the effects of stress, sleep, and multi-tasking on brain development and learning. Students will consider how research findings inform practice and policies in education and related fields. (3 credits)

ED.855.710 Multicultural Education
The rapid and explosive demographic shifts in this country among culturally and linguistically diverse students, the fact that these students are projected to comprise the majority of school age students by the year 2020, and the current educational trajectory of students from marginalized groups provide a compelling rationale for identifying strategies and interventions for facilitating transformative multicultural approaches to education. Using Pedersen’s tripartite model of multiculturalism, students will address the requisite awareness, knowledge, and skills for enhancing their multicultural competencies. Students will create a conceptual framework to organize research approaches related to this model and to inform the development of their applied project of practice. (3 credits)

ED.855.712 Multiple Perspectives on Learning and Teaching
This course will survey classical theoretical perspectives on learning and teaching, including behaviorism, cognitive, constructivist, sociocultural, social cognitive, and situative perspectives. Students will examine the research literature to identify the strengths and limitations of these perspectives in relation to understanding issues within their organizations. They will create a conceptual framework to organize these research approaches and to inform the development of their Problem of Practice. (3 credits)

ED.855.714 Power, Politics, and Policy in Education
Government entities have increasingly molded public education. In the United States, federal laws and mandates have enormous influence on local schools; state governments have endorsed and implemented national Common Core curriculum standards; and funding is based on top-down distribution while mayors, school boards, parents, students, and other local stakeholders bid for local control of their schools. In this vein, other political groups press for reductions or the elimination of federal involvement in schooling. These transactions involve power relations and concepts of democracy and freedom. Through this course, students will examine various theories, concepts, principles, and dynamics of power, politics, and policy and how these ideas apply to education, organizations, and leadership. (3 credits)

ED.855.716 Contemporary Approaches to Educational Problems
Building on the concepts introduced in Disciplinary Approaches to Education, students will apply these approaches to case studies of current educational reforms, examining the ways in which these methods lead to different insights about education. For example, case studies might include the use of standardized tests to evaluate teachers or of merit pay to improve student outcomes. This course will also introduce issues from emerging non-traditional educational sectors and providers including for-profit educational organizations and social entrepreneurial organizations. Students will use the course to further develop a review of the literature on a topic of their choice relevant to their problem of practice significant to their workplaces and develop innovative solutions to these issues. (3 credits)

ED.855.718 Disciplinary Approaches to Education
Educators use theories, concepts and approaches from sociology, economics, history, anthropology, and other disciplines to make sense of problems in their field. This course introduces the concepts central to these approaches. Students will learn about these theoretical perspectives through reading central texts related to these disciplines of educational theory and will develop a theoretical frame for their Problem of Practice project based on the perspectives examined in the class. (3 credits)

ED.855.720 Leadership in Educational Organizations
Through this course, students will examine contemporary educational practices and their relationship to leadership theories, models, and strategies. This course will focus on new and historical perspectives related to leadership development, group dynamics, and effective individual and organizational behaviors, visioning, and transformation. This course navigates the complexities of human behavior and organizational outcomes from psychological and behavioral perspectives and includes empirical findings drawn from neuroscience focused on resilience and the emerging field of neuro-leadership. Course participants will continue to frame and examine a contemporary problem of practice significant to their workplaces and develop innovative solutions to these issues. (3 credits)

ED.855.725 Research Landscape
This course is designed to teach students the skills necessary to understand different
paradigms and methods of research. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate quantitative and qualitative research. Further, students develop an understanding of the principles, processes, and purposes of different types of educational research. Types of research methodology that will be discussed include: experimental research, quasi-experimental research, correlational research, single‐subject research, and qualitative research. Students will develop an understanding of the quality indicators and high standards necessary to conduct educational research within their areas of interest. Further, students will have the opportunity to develop the skills to critique quantitative and qualitative research studies published in peer review journals. (3 credits)

ED.855.730 Doctoral Directed Readings
Students work under the direction of a faculty member to explore literature related to a specialized topic in education while developing a product, such as a paper, article, or course syllabus. (3 credits)

ED.855.741 Special Education Research
In this seminar, doctoral candidates become acquainted with the tools and methods necessary for engaging in and understanding of special education scholarly activity. Students will begin to: (1) define their future roles and responsibilities as doctoral level professionals with an understanding of the field of special education, (2) develop solutions to their Problem of Practice (POP) and (3) write using current research based special education citations to support their solution. Students will continue to develop solutions to their POP, hypotheses, literature searches, and technical writing. Research studies on topics of current interest in special education across various school districts that affect students who receive special education services and/or curriculum development aimed at improving delivery of content to students with IEPs will be reviewed and discussed. (3 credits)

ED.855.743 Students with Disabilities and High Needs Schools
This seminar focuses on what constitutes a high needs school and what we know about effective practices for improving the academic performance of students, especially students with special education needs. Seminar participants will have the opportunity to critique the literature regarding school reform efforts, with a particular emphasis on initiatives to reduce the achievement gap between students with and without disabilities and the cultural/linguistic diversity in special education.  Students will continue to work on developing a solution for their Problem of Practice and will pilot this solution on a limited basis. (3 credits)

ED.855.751 Diffusion of Technology Innovations
This course explores theories, research, and strategies related to the diffusion and adoption of scalable and sustainable instructional technology innovations in education. It targets the diffusion of technologies and the transition from experimentation and research to adoption and implementation. Participants review contemporary theoretical developments in the science of implementation through evidence-based educational examples and are introduced to current technologies and anticipated future trends and ubiquitous practices in the field. Participants apply these processes and strategies to their literature review to inform the implementation of their solution or intervention related to their Problem of Practice project. (3 credits)

ED.855.752 Trends, Principles, and Practices of 21st Century Learning
This course provides team-based learning experiences to explore pedagogical shifts in education, examine advances in digital tools, and consider how these shifts and tools impact leadership, organization, instructional delivery, and student learning in today’s schools. Participants learn essential principles and practices for building 21st century, content-rich learning environments for virtually all students, including those with disabilities and other special needs. One of JHU’s premier educational approaches, Boundless Learning, that incorporates core 21st century practices, such as productive teamwork, creativity, digital tools, differentiated instruction, inquiry, and progress monitoring, is highlighted. Participants are afforded opportunities to connect new understandings of 21st century teaching and learning to their solution or intervention related to their Problem of Practice project. (3 credits)

ED.855.753 Digital Age Technology and Instruction
This course provides opportunities for participants to explore a variety of technology trends and pedagogical shifts in a range of topics related to personalized learning environments, mobile learning, assistive technology, cloud computing, and the sharing of digital resources. Participants conduct needs assessments to determine which practices improve the implementation of technology at the organizational level and gauge the capacity of their school organization in implementing digital age technology successfully. Participants draw upon relevant instructional theories, conceptual frameworks, and effective best practices as criteria for selection, implementation, and integration of technology, and apply these theories and frameworks as they begin to construct a literature review to inform their solution or intervention related to their Problem of Practice project. (3 credits)

ED.855.755 Controversies in Measurement for Education Science Research
While delivering core concepts from measurement theory, this course will introduce students to the full range of measurement controversies relevant to current education science research, with a special emphasis on K-12 schooling in urban settings. Measurement controversies will include alternative perspectives on test construction and scaling, measures of high school dropout, indices of behavior problems, course sequences and curriculum tracks, measures of segregation and network structure, and alternative positions on how to measure resource inputs into schools. The course will consider how the conclusions of education science research have been shaped by constraints on measurement, as well as the prospects for pushing out the frontiers of knowledge by breaking through these constraints. (3 credits)

ED.855.756 Higher Education Teaching Skills for Doctoral Students
This course will provide a mechanism for students in the PhD program to obtain credits as a teaching assistant. (3 credits)

ED.855.760 Advanced Counseling Theories
This course provides an intensive examination of major counseling theories, including the psychodynamic, humanistic, and cognitive-behavioral approaches, which students evaluate from both a historical and contemporary context. Attention will be given to theory construction and development, the counselor-client relationship, the utility of specific counseling theories with diverse client populations, relevance of certain theories given clients’ presenting concerns, as well as process and outcome research which is evaluated as the basis for continued use of a theoretical system. Students will apply these theories and frameworks as they begin to construct a literature review to inform their Problem of Practice project. (3 credits)

ED.855.761 Social Justice
This course examines the complex interplay between race, ethnicity, and culture and the sociocultural and sociopolitical experience of the client both within and outside the counseling experience. Emphasis will be placed on mental health disparities, racial identity functioning power, oppression, privilege, linguistic diversity, income inequality, immigration, religion and spirituality among culturally and linguistically diverse client groups. Attention will also be devoted to a range of counseling interventions that promote client empowerment, alleviate psychological distress, stimulate wellness, enhance coping and facilitate resilience. Students will apply these evaluation and research interventions to further the exploration of their Problem of Practice. (3 credits)

ED.855.764 Foundations of Education Science Research
Education science research has matured steadily over the past 75 years, and this course will deepen the appreciation for the contours of its development. The course will focus on the reciprocal development of models of individual achievement and attainment and models of the growth and functioning of educational institutions. The course will consider the major empirical results that have been established along the way, as they have interacted with contemporaneous policy concerns across the decades. The course will conclude with a critical examination of the frontiers of both education science research and policy debates in the United States. (3 credits)

ED.855.830 Interdisciplinary Seminar I: Seminar in School Improvement
Students explore current research and scholarly perspectives on school improvement, school reform, urban education, and the science of learning. Students will be exposed to faculty conducting research in these areas. Participants will develop and articulate their own broad research interests and will have an opportunity to explore the alignment of those interests with different faculty members. Participants will develop perspective papers and make brief presentations to their peers. Peers will be asked to provide feedback. (3 credits)

ED.855.835 Interdisciplinary Seminar II: Socio-Cultural Perspectives
This seminar will provide candidates the opportunity to examine race, ethnicity, and culture within the context of pre-K-12 and higher educational settings. Students will become familiar with the major racial, ethnic, and cultural groups in the United States. Through self-disclosure, experiential exercises, student presentations, readings, and lectures, students will gain a better knowledge of themselves, culturally distinct groups, multiculturalism, and implications for education. (3 credits)

ED.855.840 Doctoral Research
Doctoral students apply theories and concepts related to their areas of study. (3 credits)

ED.855.841 Doctoral Internship II
Doctoral candidates read, review, discuss, and write about topics of interest in current educational contexts. (3 credits)

ED.860.502 Self-Care and Wellness for Counselors
Compassion fatigue (Figley, 1993), also called secondary traumatic stress disorder, refers to the emotional effects on the counselor of exposure to working with those who have experienced traumatic events. Many counselors fail to recognize the signs and symptoms of compassion fatigue, and they do not take preventive measures to avoid the physical and psychological problems that can result. This course will introduce students to key concepts related to secondary traumatic stress, compassion fatigue, stress, and burnout, and will help them explore self-care as a way to prevent problems. Students will have the opportunity to assess their current level of resilience and to experience a several self-care activities that promote physical, emotional, and spiritual wellness. Students will be introduced to the transtheoretical change model developed by Prochaska et al. (Prochaska, Norcross & DiClemente, 1995) that they will apply in developing a personal self-care plan. Although the primary focus of this course is on the individual counselor, some attention will also be given to organizational issues that can contribute to mental health workers’ role fatigue, as well as ways to address these larger systems issues. (1 credit)

ED.860.548 Counseling Clients with Eating Disorders
This course provides students with an overview of current issues facing adults and children who struggle with eating disorders and eating disorder related symptomatology, with a particular emphasis on defining and assessing eating disorders from a multicultural perspective. Students will learn about the multiple risk factors that contribute to eating disorders, as well as the psychological, physical, educational, societal, and counseling implications for eating disorders. (1 credit)

ED.860.556 Adlerian Approaches to Counseling
Adlerian principles and practice in counseling and therapy are examined, with an emphasis on practical application. Important Adlerian ideas are covered, such as family constellation and birth order, lifestyle, goals, striving for significance, community feeling, social interest, teleological behavior, early memories, and the concept of the self. Many Adlerian techniques are covered, including paradox, acting as-if, use of metaphor, humor, push-button, catching oneself, and spitting in the client’s soup. The use of Adlerian counseling in the context of school, group, and families is also studied. (1 credit)

ED.860.561 Adolescent Suicide: Counseling Assessment and Prevention
Participants review potential indicators leading to adolescent suicide. Students consider psychosocial factors of adolescent suicide, the influence of the school environment and support systems, the parenting process, and data on the incidence of suicide with emphasis on counseling intervention, assessment, and prevention strategies. (1 credit)

ED.860.579 The WDEP Formulation:  Learning and Practicing Reality Therapy
This interactive course focuses on practical skills immediately useful on the job; skills that can be integrated into other theories. It includes discussion, role-playing demonstrations of cases presented by participants, and small group practice. Participants will gain a working knowledge of choice theory, the basis of reality therapy, followed by an explanation and demonstration of the WDEP system (wants, doing, evaluation, planning). Integrated into the session will be a review of research on reality therapy and a discussion of misconceptions about the practice and implementation of the principles of reality therapy. (3 credits)

ED.860.594 Stress Management:  Counseling Implications
Counseling students examine theories of stress within the framework of situational and developmental stages. Students explore individualized responses and coping mechanisms related to daily stressors, as well as physiological and emotional responses to stress. Implications for social and family systems are discussed. (1 credit)

ED.860.597 Career Coaching: Innovative Career Counseling Practices
This course provides grounding in the theory and practice of coaching models for intervention as applied to career counseling practice. Increasingly, career counselors and other counseling and human services professionals are adapting coaching strategies for working with clients confronting significant developmental challenges. The technology of coaching is explored, and its implications for innovative career counseling practices considered. The course includes both didactic and experiential learning. (1 credit)

ED.860.614 Counseling Individuals with Anxiety Disorders
Students in this course review the nature of anxiety and how it affects human functioning, performance, and interaction. Topics such as phobias, panic attacks, stress management, and general anxiety are discussed. The emphasis of the course is on effective treatment using a wide range of approaches. (1 credit)

ED.860.615 Domestic Violence: Its Implications on Spouses and Children and Remediation Strategies for Mental Health Professionals
Despite the fact that more and more members of society have developed heightened awareness of the incidence and impact of domestic violence in the United States, many men, women, and children are still affected by violence in their families. The emotional, social, and physical impacts are far-reaching and usually have serious long-term effects. This seminar addresses the dynamics that occur in violent families, with particular emphasis on counseling strategies that can be used by mental health professionals when working with spouses, children, and other family members. (1 credit)

ED.860.616 Achieving Change with Difficult Clients
The mechanisms and processes of therapeutic change are detailed according to the latest research literature, and applied in the context of working with defiant, unmotivated, or otherwise resistant clients. Much of the course is devoted to providing specific techniques and strategies that are directly relevant to positive outcomes. (1 credit)

ED.860.624 Introduction to Psychodynamic Counseling
Participants are introduced to the major concepts inherent to psychodynamic models for counseling and therapy.  Emphasis is placed on the contributions of Freud and other theoreticians of his period, object relations models, and contemporary counseling/therapy approaches based on psychodynamic concepts and methods. (1 credit)

ED.860.639 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Depressed Clients
Advanced counseling students and professionals review the theory and practice of Cognitive and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in treating depression. Various forms of affective illness are discussed in the context of counseling and therapy. Recent advances in theory and strategies are presented with particular emphasis on narrative and constructivist approaches. (1 credit)

ED.860.640 Introduction to Positive Psychology
This course provides an introduction to the study of topics related to happiness and the positive aspects of human experience. Emphasis will be placed on the significance of optimism, well-being, resilience, strong social connections, and the value of contributing to something bigger than oneself. Positive psychology interventions will be addressed. (1 credit)

ED.860.650 Asian Meditation Therapy
Much of what Western counseling and therapy considers to be contemporary and original has been practiced by Asian cultures for over two thousand years. Much more can be adapted from these cultures.  This course surveys Asian techniques of human development and human potential focusing on the methods of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Yoga psychology and philosophy. The emphasis of the course is on meditation and the personal development of counselors and their clients. (1 credit)

ED.860.651 The Many Facets of Grief
This seminar provides participants with information that is pertinent to counseling clients who are adjusting to transitions and losses. Topics such as the stages of grief and loss, the four tasks of mourning, the difference between normal and dysfunctional responses to transitions and loss, blocks to successful grieving, helpful responses to bereaved clients, signs of recovery, and guidelines for facilitating loss support groups are discussed, illustrated, or demonstrated. Students should expect to participate in a number of small group experiences as concepts are presented and illustrated. (1 credit)

ED.860.655 Developing a Successful Private Practice
This course assists participants in developing a successful private practice and is suitable for those who have not yet launched a private practice, as well as for those who have already begun a practice. Students learn the pros and cons of a private practice. Topics include defining the practice, business planning, setting up an office, developing consent to treatment and other forms, recruiting clients, billing, dealing effectively with managed care, writing treatment plans and authorization requests, assessing treatment effectiveness, and many other topics. (1 credit)

ED.860.657 Children and Resiliency: Helping Children Cope With Trauma and Violence
Students develop an understanding of the effect of trauma and violence on children and learn practical concepts and tools to use with young children to adolescents. The course focuses on children and traumatic grief, techniques for traumatic grief work with special considerations for terrorism, war, school violence, and bullying and victimization issues. The course also provides information on children and resiliency, and ways counselors can encourage caring adults to support attributes of resiliency in children and adolescents. (1 credit)

ED.860.660 Psychopharmacology for Counselors
Participants are introduced to the major categories of psychopharmacologic medications and gain an understanding of and appreciation for the use of these medications in the treatment of mental and emotional disorders. The counselor also learns about the need for effective collaborative relationships with psychiatrists and other physicians. (1 credit)

ED.860.662 Counseling Refugees and Immigrants
This course provides an overview of issues, skills, and practice related to counseling refugee and immigrant populations. Students will develop an understanding of pre-migration trauma and issues that impact refugee and immigrant mental health, as well as explore post-migration issues related to mental health, acculturation, and psychosocial adjustment. The Multi-Level Model of Psychotherapy and Social Justice (MLM) will be presented with opportunities for practice and skill development. (1 credit)
Prerequisite(s):  ED.861.507

ED.860.692 Counseling Gay and Lesbian Youth
This course is designed to help professionals become aware of the societal issues and developmental needs of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and questioning youth. School-based interventions are presented, including interventions related to staff development and individual and group counseling. (1 credit)

ED.860.708 Systemic Assessment of Child Abuse
Child abuse and neglect is a serious issue that threatens the lives and well-being of millions of children in the US each year. Counselors working with families must become skilled at recognizing and identifying children who are at risk for abuse and neglect. This course addresses issues of assessment, intervention, law, and ethics in the field of child abuse. (1 credit)

ED.860.710 Sexuality and Intimacy in Couple and Family Counseling
This course is designed to promote greater understanding of sexual functioning and intimacy through a study of historical, multicultural, and relational perspectives on human sexuality. Specific sexual issues will be examined as these relate to clinical and relational issues in couples and families. (1 credit)

ED.861.502 Counseling Theory and Practice
(Lab course)  This course provides an overview of the major theories of counseling and therapy, such as cognitive, behavioral, existential, Gestalt, and Adlerian. Students explore integrative approaches as well as multicultural and feminist perspectives. Participants focus on a wide range of specific techniques and practices that are associated with each theory and how they are applied in various situations. (3 credits)
Note: Students are required to attend the two-day laboratory sessions. Laboratory courses and internship classes involve an exploration of personal factors as they contribute to counseling skills and techniques.

ED.861.503 Group Counseling and Group Experience
(Lab course)  Students investigate practical and theoretical concepts of group dynamics and group counseling to acquire skills in facilitating various kinds of group interaction. Students explore interpersonal dynamics, personal communication styles, fundamental group counseling strategies, and group facilitation through class and laboratory experiences. (3 credits)
Note: Students are required to attend the two-day laboratory sessions. Laboratory courses and internship classes involve an exploration of personal factors as they contribute to counseling skills and techniques.

ED.861.507 Counseling Techniques
(Lab course) This course provides an overview of the history and philosophy of professional counseling, with special attention to the roles, functions, and limitations of school, community, and organizational counselors. Included is an understanding of the essentials of basic counseling skills; attending, listening, and interviewing stages of clinical treatment; and client/counselor relationships. Students learn about  professional counseling organizations, professional credentialing, and standards and ethics in counseling and related human services. The course emphasizes self-growth, awareness, and observational skills as related to becoming a facilitator of individual, group, family, and systems change. (3 credits)

ED.861.511 Career/Life Development and Planning
Participants review major theories of career development and decision making, occupational sociology, and vocational psychology. The course places career counseling concepts in a life-span perspective and reviews career development materials and cross-cultural strategies. (3 credits)

ED.861.609 Diagnosis in Counseling
Students study the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM V) to learn to assess, diagnose, and treat psychopathology based on current DSM criteria. Theories related to the etiology of major categories of mental disorder such as anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and personality disorders are examined. Students gain an understanding of the impact of abnormal behavior on individuals, families, and society. Instructors provide a developmental framework for understanding diagnosis from multicultural, feminist, and systems perspectives. (3 credits)

ED.861.612 Appraisal and Testing for Counselors
Students explore individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation through the use of standardized test instruments and rating scales. Emphasis is given to principles of test construction, reliability and validity, psychometric properties, and strategies for the selection, administration and interpretation of behavioral, psychological, and educational tests. Implications of age, gender, ethnicity, culture, heritage, language, disability, and professional/ethical issues are examined. (3 credits)

ED.861.614 The Foundations of School Counseling
This course is a survey of the knowledge base and practices in contemporary school counseling. It will emphasize the educational, historical, sociological, economic, philosophical, and psychological dynamics of the professional school counselor’s role. Students integrate knowledge and learn skills to examine data driven comprehensive school counseling programs that enhance academic, career, and personal/social development for all students. (3 credits)

ED.861.668 Role-Play and Related Experiential Methods in Counseling
This didactic and experiential course will introduce students to the theory and methods developed by Jacob .L. Moreno, M.D., who originated group psychotherapy, psychodrama, and sociometry (the measurement of social relations). Students will have the opportunity to see a full psychodrama (via videotape) and to participate in limited psychodramatic structures to gain first-hand experience with the method. Students will also practice limited psychodramatic and sociometric techniques during supervised in-class practice sessions. Special attention will be given to the safe and ethical use of action methods with specific populations, including trauma survivors and other vulnerable populations.  Culturally competent practice will also be discussed. Applications of psychodrama and related action methods to individuals, couples, families, and groups will be discussed. (1 credit)

ED.861.713 Advanced Treatment Approaches
This course explores a wide range of effective techniques and strategies in counseling and therapy, in the context of successfully treating various mental and emotional disorders. Approaches and procedures from such diverse models as psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, experiential, and systemic are explored, along with theories of change and research findings on effective counseling and therapy. (3 credits)

ED.863.501 Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling
This course provides an overview of the role and scope of the clinical mental health counseling profession. Students address a number of topics including the historical, theoretical, philosophical, and empirical foundations of clinical mental health counseling. The course addresses role functions and employment settings of mental health counselors; program development, emergency management, prevention, intervention, consultation, assessment approaches, and education; and the contextual dimensions of diverse clients seeking mental health counseling services. This course is a requirement of our accrediting body, the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). This is a foundational course that prepares students to work in a broad range of mental health counseling programs by acquainting them with the foundations of clinical mental health counseling. (3 credits)

ED.863.503 Introduction to Neuroscience for Mental Health Clinicians
This course will examine a selection of recent advances in neuroscience that provide clinicians with alternative ways of thinking about mental disorders. As we have moved beyond the Decade of the Brain (1990-2000), ever more exciting findings from research have emerged. We will examine examples of mental disorders where the evidence for structural and/or functional brain abnormalities is strongest. The implications of this for assessment, prevention, and treatment will be discussed. Examples from the major life stages of childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and old age will be examined. We will make use of recent research articles to frame the discussion. (1 credit)

ED.863.524 Individual and Group Dynamics: Behavior in Context
Individual and group dynamics are at the core of adaptive or maladaptive human behavior. A solid grounding in basic empirically-derived principles of motivation aids counselors in better formulating and presenting problems and in conceptualizing appropriate interventions. Foundations for this course are derived from classic theories and research findings in personality psychology, social psychology, cross-cultural psychology, and neuroscience. Students explore the influence of the person, the situation, and cultural diversity as forces in shaping behavioral tendencies. A unifying theme within the course is the influence of resilience as a dispositional perspective for both the client and the helping professional. (3 credits)

ED.863.526 Introduction to Play Therapy with Children
The major goal of this course is to facilitate students’ knowledge, dispositions, and skills to counsel children through play therapy and other major theoretical applications. Students’ learning will be facilitated through didactic presentations, interactive discussions, and supervised counseling practice with elementary school children. This course also emphasizes the counselor's collaborative work with children’s legal guardians/family members. (3 credits)

ED.863.527 Counseling the Early Adolescent
Students explore the physical, emotional, and social development of the early adolescent population (ages 10-14) and examine the relationship between development and counseling needs. Students review relevant research; apply individual and group counseling theory and techniques; and explore issues such as self-esteem, peer pressure, sexuality, substance abuse, anger, violence, suicide, and family relationships. Relevant ethical and legal issues are addressed. (3 credits)
Note: This course must be taken prior to ED.863.820. Master’s students must have completed a minimum of 15 credits before registering for this course.

ED.863.571 Counseling Adolescents
This course provides an overview of the various aspects of adolescent counseling, ranging from adolescent depression, suicide, crisis, drug and alcohol abuse, peer pressure, self-esteem issues, culture, family issues, and developmental themes. Part of the course is dedicated to examining current research on adolescents. The emphasis of the course is on clinical training in group, family, and individual contexts. Relevant ethical and legal issues are addressed. (3 credits)
Note: This course must be taken prior to ED.863.820. Master’s students must have completed a minimum of 15 credits before registering for this course.

ED.863.603 Couple and Family Therapy
(Lab course) Students study the theory and practice of family therapy with an emphasis on models of family development and major approaches to intervention with families. Systemic models of family intervention are emphasized, as well as the study of other historically important and contemporary approaches to family therapy. The course blends didactic and experiential learning. (3 credits)
Note: Students are required to attend the two-day laboratory sessions. Laboratory courses and internship classes involve an exploration of personal factors as they contribute to counseling skills and techniques. Master’s students must have completed a minimum of 15 credits before registering for this course.

ED.863.607 Diversity and Social Justice in Counseling
Participants explore aspects of counseling clients from diverse ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Through didactic and experiential learning techniques, students consider counseling strategies for enhancing cross-cultural interventions. (3 credits)

ED.863.624 Building Effective School Family Community Partnerships: Models for Education, Health, and Youth Professionals
Research indicates that school-family-community partnerships are integral to fostering resilience and academic achievement for children and youth. School leaders, teachers, counselors, social workers, psychologists, health professionals, and youth workers all play integral roles in building partnerships to promote youth’s academic, personal-social, and college-career development in schools and community settings. In this course, education and health professionals will learn partnership models and skills and design partnership activities and programs to engage, equip, and empower families, communities, and school personnel as active partners in promoting youth success, school improvement, and community development. (1 credit)

ED.863.626 Behavioral Medicine and Health Psychology Applications in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
This course provides a broad introduction to the field of behavioral medicine as part of the field of health psychology. Through a culturally-sensitive biopsychosocial lens, students examine theory and research as it applies to behavioral and emotional factors that impact the delivery of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention efforts as part of a multidisciplinary team within medical settings. The content will explore applications of behavioral medicine and health psychology principles to a variety of health care conditions as they occur across the developmental continuum, preparing the clinical mental health counselor for a variety of roles in health care systems. (3 credits)

ED.863.629 College Admissions Counseling
This course presents an overview of college admissions counseling for those who work with students making the transition from high school to college (e.g., middle and high school counselors, teachers, and college admissions personnel who want to become more familiar with high school processes and protocol). Effective strategies and practices that enhance students’ college readiness will be introduced and practiced. Topics for the course include: the college counselor’s timeline, resources available to counselors for college applications and financial aid planning, academic planning for college readiness, tips for writing college recommendations, developing a school-wide college-going culture, dismantling inequities in college admissions, and managing a college counseling office. (3 credits)

ED.863.630 Addictions Counseling I: Theory and Approaches
Students explore the fundamental principles of addictions counseling from a wide range of perspectives.  These include the psychopharmacological aspects of alcohol and abusable drugs, along with theories and assessments of addictive disorders. Many treatment models are considered and examined in the context of individual, group, and family therapy perspectives. The course also addresses the research literature on codependence, COA’s, AA and other 12-step programs, dual diagnosis, relapse, prevention, and multicultural and gender issues. (3 credits)

ED.863.631 Addictions Counseling II: Techniques and Strategies
This course includes a wide variety of techniques and strategies for effective counseling with clients with addictive behaviors. A practice oriented approach is taken involving in-class demonstrations, simulations, and role-plays, utilizing techniques taken from various theories and applied in individual, group, and family contexts. The emphasis of the course is on intervention skills and working with resistance. (3 credits)

ED.863.650 Working with Children’s Contemporary Issues of Grief and Trauma
This course recognizes a multitude of loss and grief issues faced by children in a contemporary world. Students gain an understanding of children’s complicated grief issues including suicide, homicide, AIDS, violence, abuse, bullying, terrorism, and trauma. Through the use of case studies, students learn how to utilize specific clinical techniques when working with children experiencing traumatic loss. Participants gain an awareness of normal grief responses in children, tasks of grief, myths of grief, and techniques useful in helping children grieve. Students learn practical ways to respond to children’s grief reactions and questions and learn grief resolution techniques to work with children in educational and counseling situations. They also learn how to recognize behaviors that signal loss and how to identify at-risk and traumatized children. (3 credits)

ED.863.652 Advanced Play Therapy Interventions
This course is designed for those who have had previous preparation in basic play therapy, and who desire to enhance their understanding and refine their skills in techniques and methods of play therapy when working with children and adolescents in school, community-based, and private counseling settings. Advanced interventions and strategies will focus on aspects related to various theoretical orientations and creative approaches to counseling young children, adolescents, and families. The usefulness of expressive art techniques, sand play, bibliotherapy, and school-based play therapy will be some of the advanced topics covered. Students will have the opportunity to receive supervised experience as they practice and observe play therapy techniques through experiential assignments. Specific discussions will focus on how counseling and play therapy influences the practice of counseling with children and adolescents, and how current empirically based research and ethical clinical practice influence the development of play therapy and counseling theories. (3 credits)

ED.863.663 Marriage and Family Therapy Assessment
This course focuses on issues pertaining to clinical assessment of couples and families. Assumptions and values underlying assessment approaches will be discussed. Specific assessment techniques will be examined, evaluated, and administered. Ethical, legal, and practical issues will be explored. Attention will be paid to theoretical underpinnings of measure, as well as their psychometric properties. (3 credits)

ED.863.674 Advanced Asian Meditation Therapies
Various styles and methods of meditation are examined from the Buddhist, Hindu, and Taoist traditions, as well as their philosophical assumptions, psychological perspectives, and research support. Many meditation methods, such as concentration, mindfulness, and bhakti, as well as various forms of Yoga and Zen meditation are studied, with an emphasis on application to mental and emotional disorders such as anxiety and depression. An understanding of Asian concepts of the ego, mind, body, mental health, psychopathology, compassion, freedom, and liberation are also addressed. A portion of class periods will be devoted to the actual practice and application of techniques studied in class and in reading assignments. (3 credits)

ED.863.681 Research and Evaluation for Counselors
Participants learn the basic concepts for understanding and conducting research and program evaluation related to the counseling and human services fields. Students study experimental and quasi-experimental designs, examine quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and learn basic statistical procedures for data analysis. (3 credits)

ED.863.718 Counseling Military Families
Students explore aspects and issues affecting military families. Students consider the military as a unique culture within American society; the cultural context of the transmission of values, beliefs, and customs; and the needs of children and spouses of those serving in the military. Considerable time will be spent exploring counseling for issues of PTSD, substance abuse, isolation, frequent relocations, deployment, reintegration into family life, anticipatory loss and grief, anxiety, uncertainty, the effects of war, managing stress and anger, staying healthy, improving sleep, and building resiliency. (3 credits)

ED.863.723 Narrative Therapy with Families
This hands-on course introduces students to post-structural thinking with specific applications to work with diverse families in multiple settings. An understanding of narrative ideas and practices will be the focus for effectively training clinicians to address contemporary issues presented by families and couples, including attention to issues of social justice. The instructor will utilize a variety of teaching methods: lecture/discussion, video examples, classroom exercises, and practice. Readings will be sent to course participants beforehand to enrich classroom discussion and to allow a focus on the underlying epistemology that informs narrative thinking and as well to allow room for extensive clinical practice.  Students will leave the course having not only an understanding of the theoretical ideas but also a sense of how to do narrative work. (3 credits)

ED.863.735 Counseling African American Children and Adolescents
The rapid and explosive demographic shifts in this country, as well as the personal, social, and educational prospects for culturally and linguistically diverse children and adolescents, give rise to the importance of cultural competence among counseling practitioners who aspire to work with this population. This course addresses the requisite knowledge and skills for working more effectively with this population. More precisely, the course explores the educational and socio-emotional needs of culturally and linguistically diverse children and adolescents. Attention will be devoted to the complex interplay between culture, mental health, and education. Specific attention will be devoted to counseling interventions that contribute to youngsters reaching their fullest potential. (3 credits)

ED.863.736 School Counseling Leadership and Consultation
This course is designed to prepare students to lead programs and employ consultation strategies in the development and implementation of data-driven school counseling programs. Students will learn leadership and school-based consultation principles, theories, skills, and models necessary to enhance the learning environment. Emphasis is placed on the role of the school counselor as a systemic change agent. Ultimately, the course will assist future school counselor leaders build effective stakeholder consultation teams that promote equitable services for all K-12 students. (3 credits)

ED.863.795 Ethical and Legal Issues of Mental Health Counseling
Participants explore professional issues in counseling, with specific regard to ethics and laws that pertain to the profession, such as ethical codes, responsibility, competence, public statements, confidentiality, reporting abuse, and dual relationships. Professional issues in the context of community mental health are also covered in terms of historical, societal, and philosophical aspects, as well as licensing, roles, policies, legislation, reimbursement, and the professional identify of community counselors. Racial and ethnic issues, as well as gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and mental status in community counseling settings are also addressed. (3 credits)
Note: Must be taken prior to internship.

ED.863.808 Practicum in School Counseling
This supervised practicum experience is offered in two modalities. The first modality is an experiential course including seminar discussions, review of major theories of counseling with an emphasis on the integration of theory and practice, interview analysis, video and/or audiotape observations, and supervised exercises. Emphasis here is given to the development of foundational counseling skills (i.e. trust building, collaborative goal development, interpretation, summarization, paraphrasing, case conceptualization). The second modality is a practicum course involving 100 hours of individual counseling and group counseling, as well as supervisory experience in a school setting or clinical setting where children and/or adolescents are served. Supervision of this experience will be provided by the on-site supervisor and a school counseling program faculty member. Emphasis here is given to the development of cultural competence, social/emotional issues of children and adolescents (e.g., depression, bullying), and school-related issues (e.g., crisis management). The course is taken near the end of a student’s program of study just prior to the internship. (3 credits)
Note: This practicum course is only open to students in the School Counseling master's program.

ED.863.820 Internship in School Counseling
This supervised experience in school counseling includes both field work and class instruction. Students spend 600 hours, over the course of two consecutive semesters (fall-spring sequence), engaged in counseling, consultation, and program development activities under the direct supervision of a practicing, certified school counselor. (6 credits taken over two semesters)
Note: This course is open only to students in the School Counseling master’s program. Students must have completed a minimum of 39 credits in the program before registering for this course. Students must attend the mandatory field placement and school counseling internship meeting held in January to begin the application and site selection process.

ED.863.830 Graduate Project in Counseling
Students of demonstrated ability with a special interest in counseling study under the personal direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of the proposed project prior to registration. (1- 6 credits)
Note: Students must have the permission of their faculty adviser to register for this course. Master’s students must have completed a minimum of 24 credits before registering for this course.

ED.863.841 Couple and Family Therapy Graduate Project
Students of demonstrated ability with a special interest in counseling study under the personal direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of the proposed project prior to registration. (3 credits)

ED.863.870 Practicum in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
This supervised practicum experience is offered in two modalities. The first modality is an experiential course including seminar discussions, review of major theories of counseling with an emphasis on the integration of theory and practice, interview analysis, video and/or audiotape observations, and supervised exercises. Emphasis here is given to the development of foundational counseling skills (i.e. trust building, collaborative goal development, interpretation, summarization, paraphrasing, case conceptualization). The second modality is a practicum course involving practical training at a community based agency or intuition. Training focuses on integrating counseling theories in social context with individual counseling practice. Emphasis here is given to the development of cultural competence in joining, trust building, developing clinical hypotheses and interventions, and collaborating with clients in the development of goals, relevant legal and ethical issues. The course includes both didactic and experiential learning and is taken near the end of a student’s program of study just prior to the internship. (3 credits)
Note: Students must have completed 36 credits and have taken 863.607 Diversity and Social Justice in Counseling.

ED.863.875 Internship in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
This supervised internship in counseling includes both class instruction and either a 600- or 1000-hour internship. Students must register for this course in consecutive fall and spring semesters, as it is a two-semester course. (6-12 credits; taken over two semesters)
Note: This course is open only to students in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling master’s program.  Students must have completed a minimum of 48 credits in the program before registering for this course.  Students must have completed all laboratory classes and received approval from their faculty adviser to register. Attendance at the January internship orientation meeting is required.

ED.863.880 Theory and Practice of Clinical Supervision
This course is a didactic and clinical study of supervision. The didactic component involves an orientation to the different conceptual frameworks and models of supervision; the context of the supervision relationship, including variables such as gender, race, culture, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, and religion; and the ethical, legal, and professional regulatory responsibilities of clinical supervisors. The clinical component includes the development of a supervisory contract, informed consent, documentation procedures, evaluation approaches, and structure for supervision sessions. Students practice supervision skills and strategies and techniques for doing individual and group supervision. (3 credits)

ED.871.501 Introduction to Children and Youth with Exceptionalities
Students investigate the major areas of exceptionality addressing the characteristics and educational needs of students with a broad range of special instructional needs. Students review incidence and etiology, diagnostic and instructional services, educational continuum of programs, and findings of recent research. (3 credits)

ED.871.502 Educational Alternatives for Students with Special Needs
Designed especially for general educators, counselors, supervisors, and administrators, this course examines differentiated instruction for students with special needs in general education classrooms. Students review the legal foundations and requirements of special education and the collaborative role of general and special educators in the implementation of individualized educational programs in general education classrooms. (3 credits)

ED.871.510 Legal Aspects, Service Systems, and Current Issues in Special Education
This survey course reviews litigated and legislated standards for special education and related services for persons with disabilities. Students explore current issues in the provision of services for persons with disabilities, including inclusion, the response to intervention (RTI), and regulations for eligibility. (3 credits)

ED.871.511 Instructional Planning and Management in Special Education
Students focus on the instructional and organizational skills necessary for teaching students who receive special education services. Topics of primary emphasis include developing effective individualized education plans, preparing and delivering exemplary lesson plans, and identifying instructional best practice strategies that promote effective classroom organization and instruction. Students create lesson plans using best practice strategies. (3 credits)

ED.871.512 Collaborative Programming in Special Education
This course focuses on collaboration themes common to various educational settings: interpersonal communication, problem solving, cultural diversity, teamwork, and family systems theory. Students examine techniques that promote effective communication between teachers, school administrators and related professionals, and families of students with special needs. Co-teaching models that work effectively are also discussed. (3 credits)

ED.871.513 Applied Behavioral Programming
This course will focus on the methodology of applied behavior analysis including how the principles of behavior can be used to make changes and improvements in classroom behavior. Observational methods, single-subject designs, behavior promotion and reduction, and generalization strategies are reviewed in relation to the needs of students with disabilities. Students assess and develop individual behavior projects that demonstrate their ability to design, implement, and evaluate behavioral support programs in an ethically responsive manner. (3 credits)

ED.871.514 Medical and Physical Aspects of Disabilities
This survey course provides students with information from the medical sciences concerning the etiologies and treatments of disabilities. Topics include human genetics and embryology; the newborn period; the structure, functions, and interrelationships of the major systems of the human body; infectious diseases; and emergency procedures. The relationship between students’ medical issues and classroom activities is discussed. (3 credits)

ED.871.860 Dissertation Research in Special Education
Doctoral students in special education prepare the dissertation proposal and conduct research under the direction of the appropriate research committee in the School of Education. Written approval of the proposal must be received from the major adviser prior to registration. (3 credits)

ED.872.500 Seminar: Current Trends and Issues in Early Childhood Special Education
Beginning students in the Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE) program will explore research, policy, and practice in the field of ECSE. Students will acquire a broader schema for roles and responsibilities, career planning, accepted standards, contemporary practice, and organizational structures related to ECSE. Students will become familiar with features of national, state, and local ECSE systems. Students will also examine issues related to reform-based preschool and primary special education in Maryland. (3 credits)

ED.872.501 Screening, Diagnosis, and Assessment of Young Children with Disabilities
The first few years of life establish initial patterns of learning, literacy, and behavior, and set the pace for subsequent development. In this course, the emphasis is on the translation of evaluation and assessment information into meaningful outcomes for young children with disabilities. Students will review instruments and procedures for screening, evaluating, and assessing the status of a young child’s cognitive development, physical development (including vision and hearing), communication development, social and emotional development, and adaptive development. (3 credits)

ED.872.502 Instructional Program Planning and Methods: Birth-3 Years
Early intervention can have a significant effect on developmental outcomes for young children with disabilities and their families. This course will prepare students to support the facilitation of a family-centered foundation for learning and literacy in infants and toddlers. Students will focus on planning, implementing, and evaluating programs for eligible infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and their families.  Topics include: (a) a survey of curricular options for young children and families, (b) selection of family-centered treatment outcomes, (c) design of instructional activities for promoting developmental progress, (d) evaluation of program effectiveness, and (e) evaluation of family satisfaction with services. (3 credits)

ED.872.503 Instructional Program Planning and Methods: Grades Pre-K-3
In this course, students will develop competencies in planning, administering, and reporting the results of a variety of screening, evaluation, and assessment instruments or procedures for children in pre-kindergarten through primary level special education programs. Students will interpret test results for purposes of: (a) communicating findings to families, (b) communicating findings to colleagues, (c) individual program planning for learning and literacy, and (d) monitoring of individualized programs.  Students will create strategies for effective management of resources and information related to the screening, evaluation, or assessment process at pre-kindergarten through primary levels of special education. (3 credits) 

ED.872.504 Materials for Teaching Reading to Young Children with Disabilities: Grades K-3
This course examines the variables associated with the selection and use of appropriate materials for teaching reading to kindergarten and primary level students with disabilities. Students will create an organized, comprehensive intervention plan that effectively integrates meaningful and engaging technology and print materials to address the essential components of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension) and written expression. Students will develop a print-rich classroom environment that promotes interests, motivation, and positive attitudes about literacy. (3 credits)

ED.872.506 Instruction of Reading for Young Children with Disabilities: Grades K-3
Students will explore evidence-based techniques that can be applied in classroom reading instruction for kindergarten and primary students with disabilities. Assessment data will be used to prepare and implement instruction in phonemic awareness, phonics, word recognition, spelling, fluency, comprehension and organizational skills. Students will develop strategies for differentiating instruction to address the wide range of reading and related language abilities found in K-3 inclusion classrooms. (3 credits)

ED.872.509 Assessment of Reading for Young Children with Disabilities: Grades K-3
In this course, students will select, administer, and interpret a variety of reading assessments to use as the basis to create individualized prevention and intervention strategies. These assessments will include formal and informal measures with a focus on the diagnosis of reading problems, individualized planning for reading instruction, and implementation of such reading programs as Orton-Gillingham, the Stevenson method, phonemic awareness, the alphabetic principle, and modification of the literacy environment. (3 credits)

ED.872.514 Development of Young Children with Disabilities
This course examines typical and atypical development of young children, with a special emphasis on the etiology of developmental disabilities. Biological and environmental influences on young children are explored within the context of family and culture. (3 credits)

ED.872.800 Exploratory Site-Based Field Experience in Early Childhood Special Education
This exploratory site-based field experience provides participants with an introduction to early intervention, preschool, and primary special education programs for young children with disabilities, ages birth through eight years of age. This experience is intended for graduate students, within their first semester of early childhood special education coursework, who have not had substantial, consistent, or recent exposure to settings and services for young children with disabilities. This field experience, in conjunction with ongoing seminars and assignments, provides an overview of the roles and responsibilities of early childhood special education teachers regarding the day-to-day operations of programs for young children with disabilities. (2 credits)

ED.872.810 Internship: Early Intervention and Preschool Special Education
Designed for students seeking Maryland special education teacher certification at the infant/primary level, this internship provides supervised field experiences in early intervention or preschool special education programs for young children with disabilities in the birth-to-five-years age range. Internship sites and activities are individually selected according to student interest and training needs. (3 credits)
Note: Must have permission of faculty adviser to register for this course.

ED.872.811 Internship: Preschool and Primary Level Special Education
Designed for students seeking Maryland special education teacher certification at the infant/primary level, this internship provides supervised field experiences in special education for children in the three- to-eight year age range. Field sites and activities are individually selected according to student interest and training needs. (3 credits)
Note: Must have permission of faculty adviser to register for this course.

ED.872.830 Graduate Project in Early Childhood Special Education
Students with a demonstrated ability and a special interest in early childhood special education study under the personal direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. The student must meet with the faculty member who will supervise his or her project prior to registration. (3 credits)
Note: Must have permission of faculty adviser to register for this course.

ED.873.601 Introduction to Applied Behavior Analysis and Special Education
This course provides introductory knowledge of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). Among the topics explored will be the scientific foundation on which ABA is built, the concepts and principles of behavior analysis, and an overview of the application of ABA in educational settings. (3 credits)

ED.873.602 Research Methods: Evaluation, Measurement and Single Case Design
The course will examine the methods of single subject research design, including defining and measuring behavior, data collection and interpretation of graphs, and single case research designs. Students will learn to utilize research methods to evaluate and measure the effectiveness of intervention and instructional procedures within an educational setting. (3 credits)

ED.873.603 Behavioral Assessment and Intervention for Challenging Behaviors
This course will investigate the principles and procedures of the field of applied behavior analysis as it relates to challenging behaviors. Observational methods, behavior promotion and reduction, and generalization strategies will be reviewed in relation to the needs of students with disabilities. Students will design, implement, and evaluate a behavior reduction program based on assessment results to decrease inappropriate behaviors for an individual student or a group of students in an educational setting. (3 credits)

ED.873.604 Behavioral Assessment and Instructional Strategies
The course will focus on developing effective teaching plans based on Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), exploring a variety of teaching strategies including discrete trial instruction, applied verbal behavior, shaping, chaining, direct instruction, precision teaching, personalized systems of instruction, incidental teaching, functional communication training, augmentative communication systems, programming for acquisition, generalization, and maintenance, and making data-based decision making  to improve instruction. Students will design, implement, and evaluate an instructional program based on assessment results to increase a desired behavior/skill for an individual student or a group of students in an educational setting. (3 credits)

ED.873.605 Ethics and Professional Conduct for Behavior Analysts
This course will provide discussion and examination of ethics and responsible conduct of behavior analysts with an in-depth review of the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2012). It will also include an overview of the behavior consultation model and examine the influence of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) on autism, developmental disabilities, and special education. (3 credits)

ED.873.606 Applications of ABA in the Classroom
This course will provide in-depth discussion and strategies regarding the implementation of applied behavior analysis in the classroom setting. Strategies will focus on documentation of services, training, and monitoring of others in carrying out behavior change procedures, performance monitoring and procedural integrity, supervision, evaluating effectiveness of intervention and teaching, and maintaining behavior change in the natural environment. Students will also learn and plan for unwanted effects of reinforcement, punishment, and extinction in a classroom setting. Students will also examine current issues in special education as they relate to the implementation of applied behavior analysis, including inclusion, effective data collection, choosing evidence based practices, and discussing the benefits of behavior analysis with other professionals. Finally, the course will help candidates prepare for the Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA) exam. (3 credits)

ED.873.610 ABA Practicum I
The practicum is designed to meet the field experience requirements as outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB; www.bacb.com). This practicum provides supervised experiences in the application of behavior analytic services in educational setting.  The practicum will also include a face-to-face seminar with an instructor. (3 credits)

ED.873.611 ABA Practicum II
The practicum is designed to meet the field experience requirements as outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB; www.bacb.com). This practicum provides supervised experiences in the application of behavior analytic services in educational setting.  The practicum will also include a face-to-face seminar with an instructor. (3 credits)

ED.874.512 Characteristics of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities: Learning Disabilities, Behavioral Disorders, and Intellectual Disabilities
Students examine the incidence, etiology, and characteristics of students with learning disabilities, behavioral disorders, and intellectual disabilities, and review major theoretical models and instructional practices associated with each. (3 credits)

ED.874.513 Educational Assessment of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities: Elementary/Middle
Students explore assessment instruments and procedures for diagnosing elementary and middle school students who are experiencing learning and behavior problems. Participants administer and interpret norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and curriculum-based instruments that assess academic achievement, social behavior, and emotional functioning. (3 credits)

ED.874.514 Educational Assessment of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities: Secondary/Adult
Students examine assessment instruments and procedures for diagnosing secondary level students who are experiencing learning and behavior problems in school. Students administer and interpret norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, and curriculum-based instruments that assess academic achievement, social-emotional behavior, and vocational functioning. (3 credits)

ED.874.524 Spoken and Written Language: Methods for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Students learn teaching strategies that can be used by teachers with students who have difficulty with oral and written expressive language. Instructional methods include both curriculum modifications and teacher-devised tasks. (3 credits)

ED.874.525 Mathematics: Methods for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Students examine effective instructional strategies for the remediation of problems frequently found in the mathematics performance of students with mild to moderate disabilities. (3 credits)

ED.874.526 Classroom Management: Methods for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
This course reviews the theoretical foundations for developing practical interventions and management strategies to deal with inappropriate classroom behaviors, as well as strategies for individualized education program (IEP) development and implementation. Behavior modification, therapeutic strategies, social skills instruction, and communication principles are applied to the design and implementation of structured classroom management programs. (3 credits)

ED.874.527 Career Assessment and Programming: Education of Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
This course examines the assessment and instructional methods needed to implement and evaluate career transition and vocational programs that promote successful post-school adjustments for students with mild to moderate disabilities. Participants review the practice of vocational and career assessment, vocational instruction, vocational counseling, and the development of recreation and leisure skills and activities. (3 credits)

ED.874.528 Diversifying the General Education Curriculum: Methods for Secondary Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Students discuss the characteristics of adolescents with mild to moderate disabilities. Students review the goals of the secondary school and gain an understanding of the range of curricular demands and graduation requirements, and their impact on students with special needs. The implications of school organization and service delivery models for students with disabilities are explored. Students develop accommodations, modifications, co-teaching plans, and projects across secondary curricular content areas. (3 credits)

ED.874.541 Reading: Methods for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Students learn to apply strategies designed to improve the reading performance of elementary/middle school students with mild to moderate disabilities. Highlighted are strategies related to word identification and paraphrasing and methods such as progress monitoring and self-evaluation. During the course, students apply a strategy with a student who is experiencing reading difficulties. (3 credits)

ED.874.542 Reading, English, and Language Arts: Methods for Secondary Students with Mild to  Moderate Disabilities
Students learn to apply strategies designed to improve the reading and writing performance of secondary students with disabilities. Highlighted are strategies designed to maximize content area reading comprehension and writing within the content areas. During the course, students apply strategies with a secondary student or students experiencing reading difficulties. This course incorporates goals and objectives that correspond to the MSDE required course, 884.508 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Area, Part I. (3 credits)

ED.874.830 Graduate Project in Mild to Moderate Disabilities
Students with demonstrated ability and a special interest in mild to moderate disabilities study under the direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of their proposed project prior to registration. (3 credits)

ED.874.860 Mild to Moderate Disabilities Internship: Induction - Elementary/Middle
Designed for students seeking Maryland generic special education certification at the elementary/middle level, this internship, scheduled approximately midpoint in a student's program, provides supervised experiences in the education of children and youth in grades one through eight who require special education services. The internship sites and activities are assigned according to each student's interest and training needs. The participant implements foundational knowledge, skills, and dispositions gained in coursework in the areas of assessment, instruction, classroom management, and individual behavior intervention appropriate for the learning characteristics of elementary and middle school age students with disabilities. (3 credits) 
Note: Must be admitted to the Mild to Moderate Disabilities degree program AND have completed a minimum of 12 credits of required coursework AND have permission of faculty adviser to register for this course.

ED.874.861 Mild to Moderate Disabilities Internship: Culmination - Elementary/Middle
Designed for students seeking Maryland generic special education certification at the elementary/middle level, this internship, scheduled near the completion of a student’s program, provides supervised experiences in the education of children and youth in grades one through eight who require special education services. The internship sites and activities are assigned according to each student’s interest and training needs. The participant continues professional development begun during the induction internship by implementing content specific knowledge, skills, and dispositions gained in subsequent coursework, with a focus on evaluating, selecting, and using reading materials and instructional methods appropriate for the learning characteristics of elementary and middle school age students with disabilities. This course incorporates goals and objectives that correspond to the MSDE required course, 884.505 Materials for Teaching Reading. (3 credits) 
Note: Must have completed a minimum of 24 credits in the Mild to Moderate Disabilities degree program AND have permission of faculty adviser to register for this course.

ED.874.870 Mild to Moderate Disabilities Internship: Induction - Secondary/Adult
Designed for students seeking Maryland generic special education certification at the secondary/adult level, this internship, scheduled approximately midpoint in a student’s program, provides supervised experiences in the education of adolescents and young adults in grades six through 12 who require special education services. The internship sites and activities are assigned according to each student's interest and training needs. The participant implements foundational knowledge, skills, and dispositions gained in coursework in the areas of assessment, instruction, classroom management, and individual behavior intervention appropriate for the learning characteristics of middle and high school age students with disabilities. (3 credits)
Note: Must be admitted to the Mild to Moderate Disabilities degree program AND have completed a minimum of 12 credits of required coursework AND have permission of faculty adviser to register for this course.

ED.874.871 Mild to Moderate Disabilities Internship: Culmination - Secondary/Adult
Designed for students seeking Maryland generic special education certification at the secondary/adult level, this internship, scheduled near the completion of a student’s program, provides supervised experiences in the education of adolescents and young adults in grades six through 12 who require special education services. The internship sites and activities are assigned according to each student’s interest and training needs. The participant continues professional development begun during the induction internship by implementing content specific knowledge. This course incorporates goals and objectives that correspond to the MSDE required course, 884.510 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Area, Part II. (3 credits)

ED.877.513 Education of Students with Severe Disabilities: Augmentative Communication Systems
Students examine the design of augmentative communication systems that include use of graphic symbols for individuals with severe disabilities. Participants design and construct communication aids and develop strategies for integrating augmentative communication into the curriculum. (3 credits)

ED.877.514 Community and Independent Living Skills
This course reviews the philosophical movements that have fostered the improvements to the instruction of children, youth, and adults with disabilities. Participants (a) apply the principles of ecological assessment in the development of curriculum sequences for children and youth with severe disabilities,  and (b) examine current research based teaching practices designed to promote the adaptive skills that contribute to the social competence and community acceptance of individuals with severe disabilities.   (3 credits)

ED.877.515 Education of Students with Severe Disabilities: Hearing and Vision Impairments
Participants review suitable methods of assessing the visual and auditory capabilities of students with severe and multiple disabilities and the instructional adaptations necessary to increase their function in daily activities. Topics include ocular and auditory pathologies and their educational implications, functional vision evaluation, and behavioral audiometry. (3 credits)

ED.877.518 Education of Students with Severe Disabilities: Management of Motor Skills
This course examines atypical variations in the motor development of students with severe disabilities, with an emphasis on the remediation of abnormal patterns in the performance of daily activities. Participants gain information about specific remediation strategies and the appropriate use of assistive equipment to promote functional positioning, movement, and oral motor skills. (3 credits)

ED.877.550 Inclusive Practices for Autism Spectrum Disorders
This course examines the legal mandates for inclusive practices in public schools and barriers to successful inclusion for students with autism. Students will identify the process for determining the most appropriate educational environment and learn the critical steps in preparing students and teachers for inclusion. Models of inclusion and instructional modifications for the general education classroom will be reviewed. Students will learn to define the varying applications of inclusive settings, plan goals and objectives that reflect the inclusion goals, and implement strategies that lead toward inclusion. (3 credits)

ED.877.551 Survey of Autism and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders
Providing a comprehensive review of current information about autism and other pervasive developmental disorders, this course draws on research findings and clinical experience from a number of related disciplines, including psychiatry, psychology, neurobiology, and pediatrics. In addition to exploring theories of causation, developmental aspects, descriptive and diagnostic characteristics, and legal and social issues, students are introduced to the primary therapeutic and intervention strategies employed with students who have autism. The theoretical basis of, and empirical evidence for, the diverse traditional and nontraditional therapies that have been proposed for persons with autism are also explored. (3 credits)

ED.877.553 Classroom Programming  for Students with Autism
Students examine the design and implementation of effective classroom programs for students with autism who differ in age and level of functioning. The course topics include classroom structure and organization, group instruction strategies, educational assessment and IEP development, data collection, curriculum, instructional activities and materials, parent involvement, and staffing and support services. (3 credits)

ED.877.555 Teaching Communication and Social Skills
This course examines the assessment and instructional strategies that have been shown to be effective in promoting the development of cognitive, language, and social skills by students who have severe disabilities, including those diagnosed with autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, or other pervasive developmental disorders. Participants examine the instructional adaptations needed to promote the development of cognitive, communicative, and social skills in students with severe disabilities, and review the relevant empirical literature. (3 credits)

ED.877.810 Internship in Severe Disabilities: Induction
Designed for severe disabilities program participants on the Maryland State certification and Non-Certification track, this internship provides supervised field experiences in the application of instructional strategies and curriculum adaptations needed to teach children with severe disabilities.  Students completing the induction internship gradually assume leadership responsibilities in their placement setting and are expected to demonstrate fluency of applied instructional and behavioral skills. (3 credits)
Note: A minimum of 12 credits of required courses and faculty adviser approval are required before registering for the induction internship.

ED.877.811 Internship in Severe Disabilities: Culmination
Designed for severe disabilities program participants on the Maryland State certification track, this internship provides supervised field experiences in the application of instructional strategies and curriculum adaptations needed to teach children with severe disabilities. Students completing the culminating internship assume a more complete leadership role in their placement setting and are expected to demonstrate applied instructional and behavioral skills at and advanced mastery level. (3 credits)
Note: Praxis II, completion of required program coursework, and faculty adviser approval are required before registering for the culminating internship.

ED.877.830 Graduate Project in Severe Disabilities
Students of demonstrated ability with special interest in services for persons with severe and multiple disabilities study under the direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of their proposed project prior to registration. (3 credits)

ED.878.501 Differentiated Instruction and Inclusion
Students examine practical, ethical, and theoretical issues in the context of national, state, and local initiatives for least restrictive placement of students with diverse learning needs, including typical students, ESOL students, students with disabilities, and those who are gifted. Individuals compare and contrast existing service delivery systems and model programs that are successful at integrating students with a range of educational needs into general education settings. (3 credits)

ED.878.502 Curriculum Design and Adaptations for Strategic Interventions I
Students analyze and adapt curricula from general education and design lessons to implement goals and objectives from learners’ individualized education programs into their general education settings. Topics include frameworks for curriculum design, assistive technology, effective teaching methods for heterogeneous instruction, and instructional planning techniques that address the needs of students. (3 credits)

ED.878.503 Educational Measurement and Curricular-Based Assessment
Students review standardized achievement tests, criterion-referenced tests, and curriculum-based measurement, and interpret results as they relate to program planning for learners with diverse learning needs in general education classrooms. The course emphasizes developing curricular-based assessments and progress monitoring of students, determining local and school norms for tests, and evaluating learners’ progress and performance in academic and social curricular areas. (3 credits)

ED.878.505 Cooperative Learning for Diverse School Programs
Students explore the recent research on cooperative learning and develop methods for using cooperative systems in heterogeneous settings that accommodate individuals with a range of diverse learning needs.  Participants discuss cooperative and peer learning programs and explore research findings and practical classroom organization and instructional strategies. (3 credits)

ED.880.603 Educating the Whole Child: Teaching to the Developmental Needs of the Urban Child
This course will focus participants’ learning on child and adolescent development consistent with developmental pathways: cognitive, linguistic, emotional, social, and physical. Topics include the needs of urban school children relative to health care, nutrition, differentiation, inclusion, special education, gifted education, arts education, higher order thinking and creative problem-solving. (3 credits)

ED.880.610 Writing Grant and Contract Proposals for Health Professions Education
Students in this course gain practical experience in writing grant and contract proposals addressing the education of health professionals for submission to state and federal agencies and to private organizations. Course topics include: (1) the purposes of federal grant and contract programs, (2) private and public sources of financial assistance for research and development activities, and (3) methods and procedures for writing technically sound proposals. Each student writes a complete grant or contract proposal during the semester. (3 credits)

ED.880.611 The Social Context of Urban Education
In this course, participants will explore, critique, and create lessons and activities that utilize all learners’ intellectual, social, and emotional styles that make up their cultural ways of knowing and doing. Participants will be introduced to a variety of strategies and practices that link home, school, and community experiences that nurture and foster students’ strengths and accomplishments. This course will emphasize the creation of classroom environments that are affirming, respectful and intellectually rigorous. (3 credits)

ED.880.613 Teaching, Learning and Leadership for Successful Urban Schools
This course will examine the principles, policies, and practices of leadership and instruction that promote effective schools. Students will be exposed to the Effective Schools Correlates, the principles of the Coalition of Essential Schools, and numerous efforts on the local and state and federal level designed to improve the quality of education particularly as those practices and policies affect urban student achievement. Students will weigh the traditional patterns of teaching, learning, and governance with current federal, state, and local standards and new evidence-based, collaborative practices. Emphasis will be placed on examining models and methodologies currently in use in Baltimore City Public Schools and other local metropolitan areas. Students will use this research and knowledge as a basis for selecting effective methods that could be adapted to their particular setting. (3 credits)

ED.880.615 School, Family and Community Collaboration, Part I
Based on numerous studies that demonstrate the importance of parents and communities being involved in children’s education, this course seeks to improve communication and partnership among all constituents. In this course, students will investigate those practices and policies that have demonstrated  successful coalitions; design activities to engage, equip, and empower families and communities to become active partners in school improvement efforts; identify resources that promote advocacy for policies that allow schools to become welcoming and affirming centers for community and family engagement; and learn and use positive means of communication to improve relations among schools, families, and communities. (3 credits)

ED.880.617 Urban School Reform
This course examines systemic school reform movements in the urban school context. School reform occurs at many different levels, from the classroom level with individual teachers, to the national level with federal mandates. We will explore reform at different levels and analyze the theory, policies, practices, and controversies of various mechanisms of reform, including the K-8 movement, small high schools, school choice (charters and vouchers), mayoral control, merit-pay, and alternative routes to teaching. Participants will synthesize information about school reform in urban schools and systems and will reflect on their role in this process. Final evaluation of reform strategies will be grounded in the effect these reforms are having on improving learning for all students in urban schools. (3 credits)

ED.880.619 Foundations of Online Teaching and Learning
This course will provide a research, theoretical, and practical foundation to online teaching and learning. Participants will engage in collaborative inquiry regarding the field of distance learning, resulting in the ability to address common assumptions about online learning, cultural competence in online learning, and ethical issues. Participants will be able to distinguish an effective online learning experience for adults and create criterion for selection, implementation, and integration of an online learning tool or application. (3 credits)

ED.880.621 Facilitating E-Learning for Adults
This course will explore concepts of teaching online that make an impact on instructional effectiveness and build community and collaboration among learners, with consideration of cultural competence and participant diversity. Participants will experiment with emerging web-based technologies, and gain strategies for promoting learner engagement and motivation. Through modeling, authentic scenarios, feedback, and ongoing reflection, participants will have the capability to effectively facilitate asynchronous and synchronous online learning experiences and support the managerial, social, and technical aspects of online instruction. (3 credits)

ED.880.623 Instructional Design for Online Learning
This course will guide participants through a process of designing online instruction for adult learners, applicable for a variety of content areas and settings. Building upon a research-based instructional design model, participants will plan online learning experiences that combine pedagogy, organization, design, and technology. Participants will be able to design media-enhanced, engaging online activities and assess learning. (3 credits)

ED.880.624 Evaluation and Research in Education
This course is an introduction to research design and methodology for students working toward a master’s degree or graduate certificate within the School of Education. It enables students to design a research project proposal while developing the intellectual tools needed to critique research within a designated area of specialization. This seminar will be invaluable for students who will be completing an action research project or master’s thesis as a requirement for graduation. (3 credits)

ED.880.625 Online Education Administration and Evaluation
Participants will apply learning from program coursework in an individualized culminating project. Participants will design and deliver an online learning initiative that incorporates research-based principles for effective teaching and learning for adults. To measure the effectiveness and impact of the online learning initiative, participants will develop and implement an evaluation plan and engage in ongoing critical reflection. (3 credits)

ED.880.627 Capstone in Online Teaching and Learning for Adults
Participants will apply learning from program coursework in an individualized culminating project. Participants will design and deliver an online learning initiative that incorporates research-based principles for effective teaching and learning for adults. To measure the effectiveness and impact of the online learning initiative, participants will develop and implement an evaluation plan and engage in ongoing critical reflection. (3 credits)

ED.880.629 Evidence-Based Teaching
This course prepares participants for leadership in education through translation of the best available evidence and application of research into educational practice. Students will develop the skills and knowledge needed to review and synthesize the strength of evidence available, and recommend educational practice changes if indicated. Topics include: a review of the research process, research critique, rating and synthesizing the strength of evidence, decision-making for educational practice in the health professions, and research and research translation opportunities. Participants will add relevant content to their professional portfolio through this course (3 credits)

ED.880.631 Ensuring Learning through Assessment and Feedback
This course prepares participants to demonstrate their ability to build an educational experience from the perspective of assessing student learning achievement. They will review the literature on assessment and examine the processes to align learning goals and objectives with corresponding learning experiences, assessments, and scoring guides. In addition, they will examine the use of formative and summative feedback to monitor and evaluate learning. Moreover, they will explore approaches to providing feedback and will engage in scenarios to practice and evaluate its use. Finally, participants will critique and evaluate approaches to assessment and feedback in health profession settings. Artifacts from course activities will be posted in participants’ professional portfolios. (3 credits)

ED.880.633 Curriculum Development
In this course, participants will propose a curricular project in health professions education, which will be documented in their professional portfolio. They will learn and apply six steps to curriculum development: problem identification and general needs assessment, targeted needs assessment, writing goals and specific measurable objectives, choosing educational strategies, implementation, and evaluation. Educational methods include readings, mini-lectures, interactive web modules, discussion groups, and application exercises. The course also addresses issues related to curriculum maintenance and enhancement and dissemination of curriculum-related work. (3 credits)

ED.880.635 Instructional Strategies I
In this course, participants will learn about various instructional strategies to enhance interdisciplinary learning experiences in health professions education. Instructional methods will include such collaborative educational models as small and large group teaching, team-based, interactive and experiential case-based learning. Techniques will include the use of simulations, as well as teaching at the bedside with a focus on educator behaviors that stimulate achievement of learners. With an appreciation of the diversity of the student body, participants will effectively integrate and apply technology into instruction to develop and deliver health professions curricula, including web-based teaching environments, content management systems, collaborative project development, and interactive media with an emphasis on instructional design advancements which affect the learning environment. Evidence of participants’ knowledge and application of course topics will be captured in a professional portfolio. (1 credit)

ED.880.637 Instructional Strategies II
In this course, the principles underlying the assessment and teaching of adult learners will be applied to classroom and clinical settings in both academic and practice environments. Selected learning style models and technology integration strategies will be examined. Emphasis is placed on the selection and application of practical teaching strategies to diverse learners. Specific teaching skills will be analyzed for their applicability to specific methodologies, settings, and learners. Course related reflections and products will be posted in participants’ professional portfolios. (1 credit)

ED.880.639 Development, Management, and Evaluation of Health Professions Education Programs
In this course participants will demonstrate their ability to implement a systemic approach to program development and evaluation. They will review the literature on program effectiveness and examine the components that contribute to success. They will also approach program development from the perspective of its critical components—population characteristics, needs assessment, content, logistics, instructional formats, implementation, assessment, and evaluation using quantitative and qualitative methods. In addition, participants will incorporate a continuous process of program improvement that includes closing the loop by analyzing information on student performance, stakeholders, trends, and funding to identify changes that will enhance the effectiveness of the program. Course products and reflections will be highlighted in a professional portfolio. (3 credits)

ED.880.641 Leadership in Health Professions Education Programs I
Leadership extends beyond management and involves multiple skills. This course addresses: 1) different theories of leadership; 2) self and time management; and 3) leadership of people, including hiring and staffing programs, communication and marketing of ideas/plans, motivation, use of power and influence, delegation and empowerment of others, promoting collaboration, leading and participating in teams, negotiation and conflict management, and integrating diverse backgrounds and perspectives. Participants will develop an understanding of their preferred leadership style through a variety of assessment instruments and create an individually tailored leadership development plan that will be placed in a professional portfolio. (3 credits)

ED.880.642 Leadership in Health Professions Education Programs II
Leadership extends beyond management and involves multiple skills. This course addresses: 1) organizational change theory and the leadership of change; 2) leadership of tasks/processes/systems (including principles of task management and the use of strategic planning, quality improvement, policy/procedure and data to achieve organizational goals and promote efficiency); and 3) resource management and creation (including financial management, fund raising, alignment of resource use, and development with function and goals). (3 credits)
Note: Open only to students admitted to the Master of Education in the Health Professions program.

ED.880.643 Mentoring in Health Professions Education Programs
This course will provide an organizational approach to managing and evaluating faculty development and mentoring opportunities, as a means of helping all faculty members realize their potential and achieve their goals and of achieving diversity in leadership. It will review the literature on faculty development and mentoring. Participants will develop the knowledge and skills needed to address specific areas such as orientation of new faculty; policy and procedures to promote faculty development and access to quality mentoring; educational sessions and programs to address teaching methods and educational technology; promotion of research and scholarship in education; and identification of resources needed to facilitate excellence in teaching. Participants will develop their own faculty development plan for a relevant part of their own institution. (3 credits)

ED.880.647 Professional Development Projects in Health Professions Education
This year-long 3-credit course is a requirement for the Master of Education in the Health Professions specializing in the Educational Leadership/Professional Development track. Participants apply principles learned in courses in curriculum development, teaching, assessment, and adult learning by designing, implementing, evaluating, and writing up a professional development project in health professions education leadership. Degree candidates work with an adviser with experience in professional development and adult learning toward the end of the post-baccalaureate certificate program or upon entering the master’s degree program. The adviser helps the candidate choose a meaningful and achievable project. Participants have the option of identifying an additional mentor at their home institution. Educational methods include regular meetings with advisers, periodic deadlines for achieving interval work, capturing reflections and artifacts in a professional portfolio, and an end-of-program oral abstract presentation and paper. Participants may use their professional development projects in application exercises during courses in teaching, assessment, and curriculum development methodology. (3 credits)

ED.880.649 Research Projects in Health Professions
This year-long 3-credit course is a requirement for the Master of Education in the Health Professions specializing in the Educational Research track. Participants apply principles learned in courses in research methodology by designing, implementing, presenting, and writing up a research project in health professions education. Degree candidates are assigned a Johns Hopkins mentor with experience in educational research toward the end of the post-master’s certificate program or upon entering the master’s degree program. The mentor helps the candidate choose a meaningful and achievable project. Participants have the option of identifying an additional mentor at their home institution. Educational methods include regular meetings with mentors, periodic deadlines for achieving interval work, capturing reflections and artifacts in a professional portfolio, and an end-of-program oral abstract presentation and paper. Participants may use their research projects in application exercises during courses in research methodology. (3 credits)

ED.880.661 Educational Scholarship: Design
Participants will develop a proposal for a project in educational leadership or for a study in educational research. They will incorporate their learning from previous courses in the program to outline the study and to begin a preliminary literature review. Participants will create a case to support the need for and contribution of their proposal. The proposal will be further developed in the Educational Scholarship: Implementation course. (1 credit)

ED.880.662 Educational Scholarship: Implementation
Participants will continue the development of their proposals begun in the Educational Scholarship: Design course. With feedback from mentors and the instructor, participants will research appropriate methodologies as possible venues for the study. They will finalize the proposal and submit for review by the instructor and faculty team. Proposals must be approved in order for participants to proceed with the completion of the master’s degree. Participants in the certificate program will implement their proposals as an educational project (1 credit)

ED.880.665 Mixed Methods Research
Participants will examine the nature of mixed methods research including definitions and applications to research questions. They will explore its foundation and review of various designs. Through the course they will be able to introduce mixed methods research to their own research questions and to describe appropriate approaches to data collection, analysis, and interpretation. They will demonstrate the ability to write and evaluate mixed methods research. (3 credits)

ED.880.667 Applied Statistics
This course covers some of the core statistical techniques used in research and analysis. It is targeted to graduate students with limited prior experience in statistics but a willingness to learn statistical concepts and an enthusiasm for quantitative data analysis. The course will cover several techniques for describing data, estimating attributes of populations, and hypothesis testing. Some time will be spent reviewing and understanding analysis implications, assumptions, and challenges when using different levels of measurement. The course will also discuss ANOVA, as well as predictive modeling with a particular focus on the role of regression (continuous and dichotomous dependent variables) in data analysis. The core of the course is the application of statistical concepts covered—it  will not focus on the mathematical and statistical computations behind the various techniques. The best way to learn this material is by working through examples and assigned problems, as well as reviewing the literature using the different approaches. Consequently, students will complete problem sets using SPSS, write a data analysis proposal, and submit an article critique. These assignments aim to connect the concepts discussed in class with the tools of data analysis in practice. (3 credits)

ED.880.830 Graduate Project in Interdisciplinary Studies
Students of demonstrated ability with special interest in interdisciplinary projects study under the direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of their proposed project prior to registration. (3 credits)

ED.881.610 Curriculum Theory, Development, and Implementation
Students examine curriculum theory through philosophical, historical, and sociological perspectives and apply course content to contemporary curriculum issues. Topics include aligning instruction with state and school district curricula and modifying curricula to meet individual learner needs. Students also explore effective strategies for implementing curriculum changes. (3 credits)

ED.881.611 Action Research for School Improvement
Students explore the role of the educator as an action researcher, with special emphasis on formulating and refining research questions as well as on selecting appropriate methodologies for classroom or school-based research. Students review research as a tool for assessing and improving teaching/learning environments. (3 credits)

ED.881.621 Effective Schools and Effective Instruction
Participants review recent research on effective schools and effective instructional techniques. Additional topics include strategies for implementing relevant research findings and implications for administrators, supervisors, and teachers. (3 credits)

ED.881.622 Advanced Instructional Strategies
Students review recent research on effective instruction and explore advanced classroom strategies and techniques designed to enhance their effectiveness in meeting the needs of diverse populations of learners. Examples include direct instruction, cooperative learning, dimensions of learning, creative problem solving, and applications of technology to thinking and learning.  Students develop expert teaching skills and learn to diagnose and deliver instructional strategies that are most appropriate in specific circumstances. (3 credits)

ED.882.511 Human Growth and Development: A Lifespan Perspective
Students consider an overview of the physical, social, and emotional aspects of human development throughout the lifespan. The course considers developmental theory and reviews current areas of research. (3 credits)

ED.882.524 Education of Culturally Diverse Students
Participants analyze recent research related to the education of culturally diverse children and youth and explore case studies of successful minority education programs. The course focuses on understanding the interrelated roles of the school, the family, and the community in addressing the educational needs of culturally diverse children and youth. (3 credits)

ED.882.640 Strategic Systems Change and Action Planning
Education leaders, public and private, need to understand the structures for teaching, learning, and managing the school and/or organizational environment. These structures include organizational visioning and action planning, budgeting and finance, and the leadership skills that incorporate instructional design, curriculum integration with standards, and logistics of technology implementation, professional development, and evaluation. This course is designed to introduce knowledge management concepts into an organizational or educational context and to provide an in depth focus on data-driven decision making in organizational and educational institutions. Participants will develop an understanding of how to create and support change through a systems approach. (3 credits)

ED.882.641 Entrepreneurial Education Leadership
This course engages the learner in understanding leadership traits and behaviors, particularly entrepreneurism, and the need for entrepreneurial leadership in educational organizations. Readings, discussions, and examples will support the development of knowledge about leadership, entrepreneurial thinking, learning and innovation. By developing a keen awareness of the competencies associated with entrepreneurial education leadership at the individual, group, and organizational levels, the learner will create a leadership strategy to address their own educational leadership challenges as they continue the work of self-directed leadership development. (3 credits)

ED.883.506 Alternative Methods for Measuring Performance
Participants explore practical classroom assessment methods that promote and measure learning. The course concentrates on performance-based assessments, including performance tasks, portfolios, and scoring rubrics. Students plan and develop performance-based assessments which require the thoughtful application of knowledge and skills in authentic contexts. (3 credits)

ED.883.510 Understanding Educational Research
Participants explore the processes and approaches to research in education. Students critique published research studies and examine both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies. Class members conduct a computerized literature search and prepare a research review in their respective areas of concentration. (3 credits)

ED.883.601 Basic and Inferential Statistics
This course is designed as an introduction to basic descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics will include the summary and analysis of data using graphs, measure of central tendency, simple regression, correlation, t-tests (independent and dependent), and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Emphasis will be place on the theoretical understanding of the statistical concepts and analyses will be described in class but accomplished using Stata software. (3 credits)

ED.883.602 Applied Multiple Regression Analysis
This course extends materials covered in course ED.883.601 Introduction to Basic and Inferential Statistics to further explore multiple regression. (3 credits)

ED.883.710 Quantitative Research Methods
Students prepare to conduct research in the behavioral sciences, particularly descriptive, correlational, experimental, and quasi-experimental research designs. Participants develop a research proposal in their respective areas of concentration. (3 credits)

ED.883.711 Qualitative Research Methodology I
Students are introduced to qualitative research methodology and designs in education. The theory and principles of observational research techniques and interpretative methodology are examined. Students are assisted in identifying components of qualitative research to look at patterns and relationships between subject and variables in a natural setting. (3 credits)

ED.883.718 Research Methods and Systematic Inquiry I
This is the first in a two-course series designed to teach students the skills necessary to design mixed methods research focused on problems of practice. The course is structured to introduce students to mixed methodology while focusing on quantitative methods, including conceptualizing and identifying problems of practice. The course is based on the premise that research develops and evolves through an iterative process. This research process requires analysis, decisions, judgments, and careful consideration of alternatives. The goals for the class include a greater comfort in reading, reviewing and critiquing educational research, increased understanding of the various designs for research in educational and related fields, especially mixed methods research design. Students will design a research project related to a problem-of-practice within the students’ organizational context as partial completion of Year 1 comprehensive assessments. (3 credits)

ED.883.719 Research Methods and Systematic Inquiry II
This is the second in a two-course series focused on mixed methodology research. In this course, students continue deepening their understanding of mixed methods research through course readings, discussions, and assignments. Students will be encouraged to explore, critique, design, and conduct mixed methods research with a focus on qualitative research methodology. This course covers key strategies of qualitative inquiry, common qualitative methods (e.g., observational research techniques and interpretative methodology), and elements of effective qualitative research proposals. Students will design a research project related to a problem-of-practice within the students’ organizational context as partial completion of their Year 2 comprehensive assessments. (3 credits)

ED.883.721 Evaluation of Education Policies and Programs
This course is intended to provide an overview of key elements and topics related to program and policy evaluation and research. Students will become familiar with types of evaluation and their purposes, including their role in research and development and program improvement. The course will also cover developing researchable questions and problem identification, logic models and program theory, threats to validity, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, qualitative and mixed methods designs, ethics, and cost-benefit analysis (3 credits)

ED.883.795 Dissertation Research Seminar
Doctoral students critique dissertation proposals, chapters, and instruments at different stages of the research process. The final critique is a mock oral examination, which prepares the individual student for the actual dissertation defense. (3 credits)

ED.883.849 Dissertation Research
Doctoral students prepare the dissertation proposal and conduct research under the direction of the appropriate research committee in the School of Education. Written approval of the proposal must be received from the major adviser prior to registration. (3 credits)

ED.884.500 Introductory Processes and Acquisition of Reading
This course is intended for students seeking initial teacher certification at early childhood and elementary levels. Participants examine the processes of language and reading development, including the impact of phonemic awareness and how the brain responds to reading acquisition. This course provides an introductory foundation for further study of specific strategies, materials, and assessment techniques in reading instruction. (3 credits)

ED.884.501 Advanced Processes and Acquisition of Reading
This foundation course provides a basis for graduate study of instructional reading strategies, literacy materials, and assessment approaches in K-12 reading education. Students examine scientifically based reading research; linguistic, psychological, and sociocultural theories and factors related to reading acquisition; and how various theories are applied to classroom reading practices. Topics include phonemic awareness, phonics and spelling, vocabulary development, text structure, fluency, and reading comprehension. (3 credits)

ED.884.502 Diagnosis/Assessment for Reading Instruction
Students in this course learn approaches for assessing and addressing the reading abilities and needs of children. Course activities include the examination of learner characteristics and implications for appropriate reading instruction. Students study and analyze a broad selection of formal and informal assessment techniques and instruments, their application to reading instruction and classroom practice, and strategies for effectively communicating relevant information to parents, educators, and other professionals about children’s reading performances. (3 credits)

ED.884.505 Materials for Teaching Reading
Students in this class develop ways to evaluate and select appropriate materials for classroom reading instruction. Course activities include reviews of commercially produced reading programs, children’s literature, remedial materials, and the use of appropriate and culturally sensitive instructional approaches for teaching diverse student learners. Materials are evaluated in relation to current research, developmental and cultural appropriateness, and student interest and motivation. (3 credits)

ED.884.507 Instruction for Reading
Students in this course study how reading research is applied to the various methods, strategies, and techniques of elementary classroom reading instruction. Emphasis is placed on developing expert knowledge in teaching phonics, word recognition, vocabulary, reading comprehension strategies, organization, and study skills related with reading and academic achievement. Participants explore strategies for differentiating instruction to address the wide range of reading abilities and cultural experiences found in classrooms. (3 credits)

ED.884.508 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Area, Part I
Students in this course learn methods for developing effective reading skills and strategies that lead to student academic achievement. The course emphasizes teaching reading strategies for secondary students that can be applied across the content areas. Emphasis is placed on advanced vocabulary learning, reading comprehension, study skills, and critical reading. Participants in the class also explore strategies for differentiating instruction to address the wide range of reading abilities and cultural experiences found in classrooms. (3 credits)

ED.884.510 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Area, Part II
Participants extend the methodology learned in Content Reading I to include applications in the classroom, with connections to assessment and informal diagnostic work done by content classroom teachers. Development of a classroom learning community, uniting theoretical, diagnostic, and instructional structures with carefully selected materials, is the goal of this course. Additionally, participants extend skill building related to reading across other language areas, such as writing, speaking, and listening, and throughout content areas. Discussion includes adult literacy, ESOL and reading in content classrooms, and organizational/study skills in preparation for employment and higher education. (3 credits)

ED.884.604 Emergent Literacy: Research into Practice
This course addresses in-depth instructional issues involving emergent literacy processes. Topics include the application of current literacy theory to alphabetics, word identification, and word study strategies for classroom instruction; designing and providing authentic early literacy experiences and literacy-rich environments; and strategies and methods for storytelling and in developing contextual oral reading fluency. (3 credits)

ED.884.610 Advanced Diagnosis for Reading Instruction
This course advances and refines the knowledge of students about advanced diagnostic processes in determining reading difficulties and designing appropriate and related interventions. Case study and small group collaboration are used to develop students’ abilities to integrate data from multiple sources, generate diagnostic profiles, and make instructional recommendations. Students learn to administer standardized and criterion-referenced assessments and about the principles, philosophies, and strategies of effective remedial approaches. (3 credits)

ED.884.612 Teaching Reading and Writing in the Content Areas to ESL Students
The reading process for speakers of other languages is examined so that participants are able to provide a variety of instructional, cognitive, motivation, and study skill strategies. Technology instruction is addressed for teaching ESL students Internet skills, as well as other computer applications to enhance reading and writing skills. Participants become familiar with the English Language Arts Content Standards, the Core Learning Goals, and their relationship to ESL Content Standards. (3 credits)

ED.884.615 Cross-Cultural Studies in Literacy
Students in this class investigate how culture, language, school and out-of-school literacy experiences, and education policy influence student attitude, learning, and content area knowledge. Participants evaluate multicultural literacy research, curriculum, literature, and new literacies, and how social and cultural factors contribute to daily classroom literacy instruction and everyday life. The course emphasizes creating democratic and culturally sensitive learning environments. (3 credits)

ED.884.617 Children and Adolescent Literature
This course examines in-depth instructional issues involving multiple genres of children and adolescent literature. Topics include the examination of text structures in informational, expository, and narrative materials; effective identification and selection of instructional and independent level texts for student reading; developing awareness of literature about, and resources related to, culturally diverse groups in the United States; understanding self as a reader and to use that understanding to inform teaching practices, engagement and motivational issues related to text instruction and selection; and how digital literature can be used in classroom instruction. (3 credits)

ED.884.620 Seminar in Reading: Roles of the Reading Specialist
Students in the final year present and evaluate their projects and plans for addressing the needs of students at all levels of reading ability in their classrooms, schools, and school districts. In addition, participants examine selected topics and issues in reading instruction. (3 credits)

ED.884.642 Linguistics for Teachers
This course acquaints teachers and other reading professionals with aspects of linguistic theory that apply in elementary and secondary classrooms. Emphasis is on a thorough, research-based understanding of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. Students learn ways to use the information to strengthen existing reading and language arts instruction. Issues of cultural diversity, second language learning, and developmental issues of language are covered in this interactive format. (3 credits)

ED.884.701 Reading Comprehension and Critical Literacy
Building on the instructional strategies and skills of earlier coursework, this advanced graduate course examines classic and contemporary research and theory in reading comprehension and critical literacy and how these dimensions and processes are applied to literacy education. During the course, students learn to explore and appreciate the diversity of literacy research perspectives, and to learn to think and write critically and analytically about research, literacy education policy, and practices that influence and are used in classroom education. These topics are overlapped by advanced instructional methods and strategies for teaching students reading comprehension and critical literacy skills and dispositions. (3 credits)

ED.884.703 Seminar in Adolescent Literacy Education
This course provides opportunities for students to explore the latest research, theory, and literacy education practices for adolescents in a seminar format. Topics include novel and useful technologies, motivating reluctant readers, and cultural and linguistic diversity in adolescent literacy education. (3 credits)

ED.884.810 Supervised Clinical Practicum I for Reading Certificate Students
The practicum for advanced reading education certificate students is a capstone experience of students enrolled in reading certificates. Candidates demonstrate abilities to translate literacy education research into practice. The overarching intent of Practicum I is to develop literacy education leaders while refining candidates’ knowledge and applications of research. Coursework centers on actual work with children and allows candidates to provide evidence of their mastery of reading education skills and strategies. (3 credits)
Note: Candidates must complete at least 12 credit hours of designated Reading graduate level coursework in their JHU program of study to take this course. Reading courses are designated beginning with "884".

ED.884.811 Supervised Clinical Practicum I for Masters in Reading Candidates
This first practicum is a midpoint program experience of Reading Specialist candidates. Candidates demonstrate abilities to translate literacy education research into practice. The overarching intent of Practicum I is to develop literacy education leaders while refining candidates’ knowledge and applications of research. Coursework centers on actual work with children and allows candidates to provide evidence of their mastery of reading education skills and strategies. (3 credits)
Note: Candidates must complete at least 12 credit hours of designated Reading graduate level coursework in their JHU program of study to take this course. Reading courses are designated beginning with “884".

ED.884.820 Supervised Clinical Practicum in Reading II
This second practicum is a capstone course that builds on all previous program coursework and especially the pre-requisite Seminar in Reading: Roles of the Reading Specialist course. Work concentrates on developing effective reading specialist and literacy coaching qualities and skills, facilitating change in school communities, and fostering teacher growth and student achievement. A strong emphasis of the course is on job-embedded professional development. Candidates deliver demonstration lessons and lesson planning assistance to teachers and conduct professional development workshops in school settings. The practicum allows candidates to provide evidence of their mastery of particular IRA leadership/reading specialist standards. (3 credits)

ED.884.850 Clinical Practicum in Writing and Other Media
Reading and writing printed texts have been, by tradition, interconnected processes. In the Digital Age, other media, such as still and moving images and audio texts, increasingly coexist alongside printed texts. During this practicum experience, candidates examine current issues involving the communication shifts that are occurring in the 21st century. Using digital literacies, writing, and object-centered multimedia ideas and instructional approaches, candidates work with teachers and students in designing, producing, and using new and traditional literacies to best prepare themselves and others for advancing technologies and practices that are changing the ways that people communicate and network. (3 credits)

ED.885.501 The Gifted Learner
Students survey a historical overview of gifted education and examine research literature, intelligence theorists, and current practices used with gifted learners to gain perspective on the academic, social, and affective nature and manifestations of giftedness. Special needs populations are examined for unique characteristics and needs to further support the premise of a diverse gifted audience. Emphasis will be placed on gifted learning characteristics as they inform identification, planning, and support strategies. Participants explore the potential role they play in working with gifted youth, alternate placement opportunities, and the identification process through case studies. (3 credits)

ED.885.505 Creativity and Critical Thinking
Participants examine the psychological and educational aspects of creative thinking. Participants review studies of the characteristics of creative children and adults, the creative process, and the identification of potentially creative children and adolescents. The course introduces teaching strategies and curriculum materials for fostering creative behavior in all subjects at both the elementary and secondary school levels. Participants will review studies of creative people and teaching strategies that foster creative behavior. Strategies for teaching higher level critical and creative thinking will be explored and practiced. (3 Credits) (3 credits)

ED.885.510 Curriculum, Assessment, and Instruction for Gifted Learners
Students explore the various approaches to differentiating curriculum, instruction, and assessment for gifted students. Strategies and techniques that are supported by research and best practice are discussed and analyzed. Comparisons of existing programs, theories, concepts, and ideas related to instructional programs for gifted students are encouraged. Students design interventions for translating theories about gifted education into practice in their personal workplaces. (3 credits)

ED.885.512 The Gifted/ Learning Disabled Learner
Participants review recent research-based findings into identification and programming for the gifted child with learning disabilities. Participants consider appropriate strategies and teaching techniques for the remediation of difficulties, as well as the development of enriched content and accelerated and innovative approaches for maximization of potential in areas of giftedness. (3 credits)

ED.885.514 Introduction to Gifted Education
Students survey the national, state, and local roles, policies, and program standards for gifted education. Learner behaviors and characteristics are examined and methods of identification are reviewed. Service delivery systems and program options for multiple settings are considered, along with instructional models and strategies. Emerging trends in identification and instruction are discussed. (3 credits)

ED.885.515 Program Development and Assessment in Gifted Education
Students will consider all the parts of a successful system-wide program for gifted and talented students.  Emphasis will be on finding and serving diverse populations, using various assessment methods to identify and place students in a gifted program, monitor progress, and measure value added for students. (3 credits)

ED.885.516 Introduction to Gifted Education
Students explore the role of the educator as an action researcher, with special emphasis on formulating and refining research questions as well as on selecting appropriate methodologies for classroom or school-based research. Students review research as a tool for assessing and improving teaching/learning environments. (3 credits)

ED.885.519 Seminar in Gifted Education
Students will explore current issues in gifted education at the local and national levels, including ways to advocate for gifted and talented programs and services, how to find and use current research, and the roles of a leader in the field. (3 credits)

ED.885.604 Social and Emotional Needs of the Gifted
Participants will examine the unique social and emotional needs of gifted and talented learners and their families. Primary emphasis will be on consultation, guidance and counseling strategies for use with diverse gifted learners including those from special populations. (3 credits)

ED.885.820 Practicum in Gifted Education
Students participate in a supervised practicum experience in an educational setting under the direction of the faculty. Individual assessment sessions are held. Students must receive written approval at least two months prior to registration. (3 credits)

ED.887.611 Understanding Human Behavior and Helping Relationships, Part I
This course provides an introduction to the various helping professions that are available to support teachers in their work with students, including school counselors and clinical mental health counselors.  The differences between these helping professions and services provided through special education will be discussed. The course addresses various approaches to helping students, as well as means for collaborating with helping professionals, consulting with other school leaders, and counseling students.  Finally, students will learn how to use data in making decisions about how best to address socio-emotional issues so as to promote academic achievement. (3 credits)

ED.887.612 Understanding Human Behavior and Helping Relationships, Part II
Building on the information presented in Understanding Human Behavior and Helping Relationships, Part I, this course examines ways of assisting with emotional disorders that teachers may face in the classroom. The main focus of the course is on recognizing the signs of these disorders and working with the school counselor to support children with these diagnoses in the classroom setting. General school issues such as bullying and abuse prevention will also be covered. (3 credits)

ED.887.615 Explorations in Mind, Brain, and Teaching
During the past decade the learning sciences have produced a vast frontier of knowledge on how the brain processes, stores, and retrieves information. Educators have increasingly recognized a role as consumers of this emerging knowledge. Participants in the course will review this research, examining how it intersects with the correlates of a model of research-based effective teaching, including the teaching of the arts across content areas. Topics of study will include the brain’s memory systems, the impact of emotions on learning, the processes involved in higher order thinking and learning, and issues related to child development. Participants will apply course studies to the creation of learning units that emphasize application of knowledge and the integration of the arts. (3 credits)

ED.887.616 Fundamentals of Cognitive Development
This introductory course surveys theoretical and empirical work in the study of cognitive development. A variety of methodological approaches are addressed, with a focus on cognitive processes related to learning. The course proceeds from behaviorist, cognitivist, and sociocultural perspectives of the early and mid-20th century to recent and ongoing research in the neuro- and cognitive sciences. Topics include the development of language, motivation, and intelligence, as well as the acquisition of skills and concepts related to mathematics, reading, writing, and problem-solving. Implications for education are considered. (3 credits)

ED.887.617 Neurobiology of Learning Differences
This course is intended to prepare educators with information about how differences and disabilities in brain development impact the abilities of school-aged children and adolescents to participate in instructional activities. Particular attention is given to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), specific learning disabilities (SLD), attention deficit disorder and attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity (ADD and ADHD), and psychiatric disorders that are found in the constellation of disabling conditions identified as emotional disturbance (ED). The course will include case studies of students with each disabling condition, with a focus on how the disability affects learning, the current status of imaging technologies, and the current uses of medications for assisting students in school settings. Students taking this course will review research and link information from lecture to the creation of an instructional unit demonstrating knowledge of how a disabling condition can be accommodated in school. (3 credits)

ED.887.618 Cognitive Processes of Literacy & Numeracy
This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study, discuss, and explore aspects of brain function that influences learning, remembering, and utilizing textual and numeric concepts. The inter-relationship of developmental factors, prior knowledge, instructional design and implementation, and assessment mandates will be investigated and discussed. Current research, differentiated strategies, technologies, and the impact of disabilities will be included. (3 credits)

ED.887.619 Special Topics in Brain Sciences
This capstone course addresses specific topics in brain research and encourages the participants to apply research to inform instructional practices. (3 credits)

ED.892.560 Assistive Technology for Educating Individuals with Low Incidence Disabilities
(Lab course) Participants explore a wide range of assistive technology applications for children with disabilities. Students consider needs based on the type of disabling condition, such as physical, cognitive, sensory disabilities, or multiple complex needs, as demonstrated by children with pervasive developmental disorders such as autism. Exploration of technology emphasizes the integration of assistive technology into effective instructional practices that improve learning research on best practices for the implementation of technology-based solutions. (3 credits)

ED.892.562 Access to General Education Curriculum with Technology Accommodations
(Lab course) Class members investigate student characteristics, the collaborative role of educators, and strategies for differentiating instruction for students with learning disabilities within the general education environment. Participants examine universal design for learning strategies and technologies to enhance student participation in educational programs. (3 credits)

ED.893.508 Technology and the Science of Learning
New technologies are part of the intellectual landscape in which new kinds of knowledge are breaking down the boundaries of previous distinct disciplines. The design and use of new technologies make possible new approaches to learning, new contexts for leaning, new tools to support learning, and new understandings of the dynamics of the learning process itself. This course examines the role of technology relative to the key concepts of active learning, metacognition, and transfer of knowledge from multidisciplinary perspectives on learning. Based on the new science of learning, students will develop and implement technology-related strategies that align instructional technology to standards-based instruction, teach problem solving and higher-order thinking skills, promote cooperative learning, and use reflective teaching and inductive approaches to increase student achievement. (3 credits)

ED.893.515 Hardware, Operating Systems, and Networking for Schools
Students in this hands-on course will examine major computer hardware, operating systems, and networking used in educational settings and address issues related to computer ethics and network security. Topics include system architecture, central processing unit capacities, communication standards, storage mediums, features and functions of operating systems, applications of electronic mail and databases, and the fundamentals of networking and the uses of classroom computers connected to local area networks and wide area networks. Students learn how to design, manage, and evaluate a variety of hardware configurations for individualized access to computing in labs, classrooms, and media centers. (3 credits)

ED.893.545 Integrating Media into Standards-Based Curriculum
Participants explore the possible ways technology can be integrated into the core standards being developed on a national level. Technology-enhanced progress tracking, evaluation, and measurement tools are explored from both a hardware and software perspective.  Online resources utilized to enhance curriculum and classroom learning are investigated, evaluated, and discussed in an open forum. Students explore untapped technology resources and work collaboratively to develop instruction that utilizes technology in the K-12 classroom. (3 credits)

ED.893.550 Emerging Issues for Instructional Technology
This course will provide students with an overview of emerging issues in instructional technology. Participants will be exposed to emerging issues for Internet-based education, including captology, digital libraries, data mining, and the use of neural networks for enhancing instructional delivery by bringing information to teachers, working with meta-tagging and objects in virtual Web-based environments, and using data as a base for making instructional decisions in schools respectively. (3 credits)

ED.893.563 Multimedia Tools for Instruction
Students examine applications of multimedia, including video image capture and multimedia production tools. Students investigate storage issues, standards, security, networking capabilities, data compression, animation, and incorporation into existing applications. Participants develop projects that integrate multimedia applications into effective instruction. (3 credits)

ED.893.601 Evaluation and Research of Technology Supported Interventions and Programs
In this course, students learn and practice the skills necessary to evaluate the use of instructional technology in educational settings. The course covers a range of alternative and mixed methods for data collection, such as observation, interviewing, the use of surveys, and analysis of data. Students develop an evaluation plan that can be implemented in their own educational settings and demonstrates their ability to select and/or develop appropriate metrics to identify the impact of technology in the teaching-learning process. Students use empirical methods to describe, explore, and/or explain the relationships between technology and program and/or individual outcomes. (3 credits)

ED.893.628 Gaming and Media Design for Learning
This course provides an overview of the learning theories behind game and simulation design, and how emerging technologies found in the commercial gaming arena can be applied for educational effect. The past and present application of virtual environments and 3-D modeling in education will be explored, with a view toward the projected future use of these technologies to engage students in tomorrow’s schools. This course brings together cultural, business, government, and technical perspectives on developing and integrating electronic gaming techniques and technologies to enhance and enrich learning. Course participants will develop an understanding of the current trends (technical and sociological) in computer and console gaming, and what can be learned and applied from the world of gaming to positively affect teaching and learning. (3 credits)

ED.893.632 Data-Driven Decision-Making for Schools and Organizations
The increasing impact of a knowledge economy and globalization has been a catalyst to the fields of knowledge management and organizational decision-making. This course is designed to introduce knowledge management concepts into an educational context and to provide an in-depth focus on data-driven decision making in educational organizations and institutions. Participants investigate how decisions and strategies are developed, and how tacit or explicit knowledge can be identified, captured, structured, valued, and shared for effective use. Course topics include leadership and strategic management relative to organizational decision-making, managerial and organizational structures, organizational learning, and decision support systems. A related intent is to develop an understanding of data mining metrics that can be used to create predictive models that support systemic change in schools. Opportunities are provided for participants to use online and electronic tools that can assist in facilitating meaningful conversations about instruction and learning among their school’s faculty and staff. (3 credits)

ED.893.634 Technology Leadership for School Improvement
Education leaders need to understand the use of technology for teaching, learning, and managing their school environment. These skills include schoolwide technology planning and leadership that incorporate instructional design, curriculum integration with standards, logistics of technology implementation, professional development, and evaluation. Students will develop an understanding of how to create and support technological change through a systems approach. Topics include sources of resistance to change, tools for planning, decision making and change, creating and supporting a culture for learning and change, and managing and institutionalizing change systems. (3 credits)

ED.893.645 Designing and Delivering E-Learning Environments
This course explores how educators use online collaborative technology tools in the classroom and in professional development so that all learners achieve at higher levels. Online collaborative tools provide a new set of technologies that focus on the social collaborative aspect of the Internet. These tools include, but are not limited to: learning management systems, wikis, webinars, image repositories, document sharing, and bookmarking tools. The collaboration and interaction aspect of these tools provide novel opportunities for K-12 students to understand rigorous content, think critically, solve problems, collaborate, communicate effectively, and become responsible for their own learning.  In addition, the infusion of online collaborative technologies into professional development allows educators the opportunity to utilize methods and strategies for effective collaboration beyond the walls of the schoolhouse. This class will introduce online collaborative tools and, together, participants will explore instructional implications, best practices, and learning activities and objectives that benefit students in the K-12 classroom setting and teachers in their professional development. (3 credits)

ED.893.701 Advanced Seminar in 21st Century Skills
The graduate seminar is the capstone course in the Technology for Educators program and reflects students’ individual mastery for using technology with diverse learning populations. The seminar focuses on examining the constructs of educational technology topics and culminates in a student online presentation of his or her capstone project. These projects showcase the products and skills developed by learners during the core courses throughout the term of their academic studies. The goals of the seminar are to engage and support participants in understanding the historical, cognitive, technical, political, and sociological issues involved in the effective use of technology in education and particularly in the integration of technology into instruction. The seminar concludes for learners with an online multimedia defense of their portfolios. (3 credits)

ED.893.708 Technologies and Creative Learning
Through the latest research in learning in the computer age, this course explores how technology can support creative learning. Henessey and Amabile (2010) state that creativity is essential to human progress. Through evidence-based research, learners will explore the computer culture and how it is shaping instruction. The age of machines is creating an identity crisis, the identity life-cycle will be explored as well as the field of human computer interaction and its effects on creative thinking. The concept of participatory culture and media education will be discussed and how they support developing digital communities of learners. We will also discuss computer- supported collaborative learning and how online communities can be catalysts for interactive media creation. We will also explore disruptive technologies, radical game design, and the new literacies in the digital age. Students will submit a final project related to design and how people create and learn with a particular technology. Part of the project is to write a theoretical or critical reflection on creative learning experiences. (3 credits)

ED.893.800 Graduate Internship in Instructional Technology
The graduate internship provides students the opportunity to individualize their program experience, to sharpen existing skills, to gain new skills, and to pursue their technology interests. The internship is designed to produce a professional, customized learning experience that stretches the student through his/her participation in the development, design, implementation, or evaluation of high-quality technology products, projects, or services. Internships are aligned to individual student’s schedules and can include collaborative opportunities with public and private sector organizations and agencies that have local, regional, national, or international interests. (3 credits)

ED.893.830 Graduate Project in Technology
Students of demonstrated ability with special interest in technology study under the direction of a faculty member in the School of Education. Students must meet with their faculty adviser and prepare an outline of their proposed project before they register for this course. (3 credits)

ED.893.850 Advanced Applications of Instructional Technology
The advanced applications course provides students the opportunity to individualize their program experience, to sharpen existing skills, to gain new skills, and to pursue their technology interests related to curriculum and professional development to support technology-based programs. Students work with their faculty adviser to create a professional, customized learning experience that stretches the student through his/her participation in the development, design, implementation, or evaluation of high-quality technology products, projects, or services. The activities in this course are aligned to individual student’s schedules and can include collaborative opportunities with public and private sector organizations and agencies that have local, regional, national, or international interests. This course supports the development of leadership expertise in an area designated by the student as a set of skills needed to advance the individual in their chosen area of study and professional practice. (3 credits)